ANSWERS: 40
  • The truth!
  • After 20+ years of driving I have learned that is is best to respond, "No." I say this, because I was pulled over during a blizzard once. When the officer came to my window, he asked for my license, registration and insurance card and I handed it over. Still saying nothing, he went back to his car. I waited. A few minutes passed and he returned to my window and handed me my papers. I asked him what I had done wrong. He gave me this look like I was dogshit! He told me he had pulled me over because I had crossed the center line. At that point I decided to keep my mouth shut. There was more than 4 inches of snow in the road and you couldn't even see the center line.
  • The proper response is "No, Sir (or Ma'am)." Anything else is admitting guilt. If you want to stand on principle and pay a ticket and damage your driving record over it, then go ahead, but otherwise just say no.
  • Honesty.
  • "You're clearly raising revenue for the State Government by issuing infringements to people for the most trivial of reasons, whilst maintaining the stance that it is your right and my responsibility and duty as a good citizen to do as you say and not argue with your unquestionable moral integrity. You more than likely realize that I am far too exhausted and busy to fight this infringment, so I'll end up just sending off a cheque State Penalities Enforcement Registry and paying for something that is essentially a minor violation that people perform every day without being fined. Anyway, I'm going to need to see some identification before I roll down my car window." At the very least, it will give you time to dump your stash.
  • I think it would be best to say "No officer, I am sorry, I don't". http://www.coldspringpolice.us/ Thankfully the kind hearted officer in Cold Spring didn't write us up. When you go through Cold Spring on Route 9D, 30 means 30.
  • "do you know why I ran that stop sign?".....;)
  • Was it my drunken behavior? ;-) Seriously, the best answer is ALWAYS one of innocence. You must appear to have no idea why you were cited -- no matter how much my may know exactly why you were pulled over.
  • "b/c you have to make your quota for the month?"
  • Does it have anything to do with the APB?
  • Well, once I honestly said, "because my headlight is out. I've replaced it twice already. There is a short in the turn signal switch which is blowing it and I had to work a shift to earn the money to buy another. I'm going to the junkyard to get another switch in the morning." He gave me a ticket, but said it would be voided if I showed up at the police station within a week to prove that I'd fixed it. I did, and he did.
  • "Was it because I ran seven red lights,knocked over four pedestrians, or was it that I shouted why dont you get a life Mr Piggy"?
  • Say nothing. Listen, and let them do the talking. Always be polite to police officers, lawyers and especially judges.
  • How about the truth. If you know or have an inkling fess-up; be polite. If you don't say "no officer I really don't - be polite.
  • No officer. Why?
  • "Because I decided to not outrun your fat donut eating ass." ^_^ And THAT'S when you want to drive off.
  • How many guesses do I get?
  • If you know say 'Yes, I know you find me attractive but I haven't got time right now.'
  • Well see that's a bit of a trick question. If you say yes, you show you were breaking the law knowingly. If you say No you just look like a moron.
  • Be sure to blame the police officer for pulling you over, because it is all THEIR falut that YOU broke the traffic rules. So what if they have quotas or not... they aren't going to get those numbers by pulling over innocent drivers. Give me one reason why I NEED to drive in such a way that will cause me to pay 'voluntary taxes' (aka traffic tickets) Be an adult and take some responsibility. If you can open, honest and humble, often the officer will let you off with a warning (assuming you're not a repeat offender).
  • Because you were hiding and I didn't see you until it was too late. Because I thought all you guys were at the donut shop at this hour. Because I was told I could go up to 10MPH over the speed limit. .. I usually wait, and as I'm handing him/her my license, registration, and insurance, ask "Why'd you stop me?" or "What was I doing?" They will tell YOU. Based on the tone, you can decide if you can then politely argue the point, if you feel you have a case. Just be polite... Explain if there were any mitigating circumstances, and hope/pray. ;-) Had a friend who said he was stopped once because he was driving the speed limit. Everyone ELSE was speeding. Cop said if he didn't "go with the flow" he'd be given a ticket for being a danger on the highway. LOL (Strange when a cop TELLS you to speed!) Here's a couple I got out of. It's fairly rare, but ... Didn't use my turn-signal once in the evening (turn only lane, you know). Where are you coming from? "I work with a band, and am coming home from practice." Did you have anything to drink? No. He asked what I was drinking. "Coffee, wanna see?" No. He went back to check the info, came back, and said, "Well, at this time of night, a lot of drunks forget to use their turn-signals. That's why I stopped you. Use them from now on." Gave me my stuff back. I said I would, and thanks. And that was that. Another time, I was "flowing with the traffic" at a place where the limit went from 70 to 55. There was a truck right beside me. The cop stopped ME. I pointed out the truck, and he said he'd seen it. Checked my info, and let me go, saying "Slow it down". And I went on.
  • Your silence is your best answer. The onus is on the cop that pulled you over, not you. Let him/her explain it to you, and let them tell you what the charge is, if they are pressing any. If they don't tell you, ask. If they give you a ticket, just take the ticket and leave. The less said by you the better. They are always looking for reasons to use their tasers or to search your car. NEVER let them search you or your car without a warrant to do so. And never OFFER anything to them either. Without a warrant, they have no business with you, other than giving you a ticket or a fine.
  • Be honest if it was just for speeding because they appreciate it a truthful person and will usually let you off with a warning if the infraction isnt too severe!
  • yes, because i did "X". fuck it, i knew i was wrong and i did it anyways. im a damn criminal. well thats what hunter thompson said in fear and loathing and it seemed to work well for him lol. except for when the pig asked him for a kiss, that must have sucked :(
  • i know but your gonna tell me what i did wrong anyways pluse give me a ticket or will you be nice and let me off on a warning
  • No, I'm too drunk to know anything!
  • I never really though about your question, until now. i generally stop at least 10 traffic violators each day. I must admit, this has been my very first question. its done out of habit and after 44 years, its hard to break. I have discovered that by asking this question, the conversation can go two ways. it can either put the driver on the defensive or it can be start a good conversation. Stopping a traffic violator and immediately stating what offense was observed, can make a good traffic stop into a bad traffic stop. immedialely accusing someone of something, ALWAYS sets a beginning bad mood. From your question, beginning tomorrow, i will discontinue asking this question on traffic stops. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.
  • "Officer your eyes looked a little glazed over. Too many doughnuts?"....;)
  • During my internship with the sheriff's office, I found that --most-- people that said "no" ended up with a ticket. If they were honest and said "I was speeding" they were issued a verbal or written warning. I also found that most officers will give you a 10-13 mph break. What I find funny is all the jokers on here saying lame things to sound "cool". Blah, Blah, Blah, say some of that to an officer next time you get pulled over and see how that actually turns out for you. 9 out of 10 times you will catch a disorderly.
  • Because I made and Illegal yet calculatedly safe maneuver.
  • OFFICER:"Sir,your eyes are red.Have you been drinking?" DRIVER:"No Sir Officer,you have a glazed look in your eyes,have you been eating donuts?"
  • In my opinion, if you do know what you did wrong then tell them. If your cool about a situation you'll find that a decent amount of cops can be cool and cut you some slack. But they will not usualy help you if they know your lieing to them or stringing them along.
  • You should say, "No officer. I don't." Make sure you roll down your window only an inch, so that there isn't room for them to get their hands in the car. Keep your hands on the steering wheel (and pull over to a safe place). Also, keep your car running (especially if it's a beater) so it will start up again! If the officer can get their hands in the car, and they see something possibly questionable, they can search your car... if they ask you to step out of your car, roll up all windows and lock your doors, and put your keys in your pocket. They will take advantage of your car being unlocked (if you're not near it) and will search the entire thing without probable cause (which by the way, they don't have the right to unless you give them permission, or unless it is unlocked, I think). And no matter what they ask you, after that "No officer, I don't," do not answer them. NO MATTER WHAT. Your miranda rights begin right there, and when you leave, they sit on the side of the road and write your entire conversation on the back of your ticket. So if there is no conversation- then there is nothing to incriminate you. http://autos.aol.com/article/safety/what-to-do-when-you-are-pulled-over/20070822111909990002 A really good video by a law professor and a cop about talking to police officers: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8167533318153586646&hl=en
  • The best answer is: I have no idea why you pulled me over. Would you like a beer, too? I'd hate to drink alone while we figure this out.
  • "Yes, it's because you're a f***ing fascist pig who needs to fill his arrest quota for the month so stops people like me rather than chasing the real criminals" And then drive off
  • "Because I am so good looking?"
  • "Why did you pull me over?" When they ask "Do you know why I pulled you over?", they are simply looking for an admission to put into the report to make conviction much easier. It's not a direct answer to the question, but if you say no, and you really were doing something wrong(let's just say speeding), then how are you going to contest anything they say you did? Cop: Do you know why I pulled you over? You: No Cop: You were speeding. You only have two choices now: a) You: No, I wasn't. Cop: Are you calling me a liar? You've just escalated the situation, and pretty much GUARANTEED a ticket, even if the cop had planned on letting you go with a warning. b) You: How fast was I going? Cop: 66 in a 55mph zone. You just admitted that you didn't know how fast you were going, so how are you going to contest any reasonable speed he says you were going? When you ask "Why did you pull me over?", it forces the cop to show you his hand. He's then got to tell you what he thinks you did. He's now got a much harder time convincing you to admit to anything. You may end up with a ticket, but if you go to court, you'll be better off. It will be his word against yours. Had you said anything else, it could easily be your word and his word against your word, which isn't too good. Another example Cop: Do you know why I pulled you over? You: Was I speeding? Cop: Your taglight is out and(because you opened your big mouth) you were speeding. How fast do you think you were going? You: I don't know. 40 or 45? Cop: The limit is 35. You basically just turned yourself in for a crime no one even knew had been committed.
  • I would ignore the question and smile and say "Would you like to see my license and registration?" They cannot give you a ticket without telling you why they are going to. So once they say "you were going 55 in a 30 zone" then say "Can you let me go with a warning?" Don't admit guilt but be polite and you'll have a 50/50 chance of some leniency. Even when you do end up with a traffic ticket, ask to speak to the district attorney or one of his ADA's on court night and show up instead of mailing in the ticket. There is a 90% chance of having the charge reduced to something that won't raise your car insurance and will be a lesser fine.
  • I agree with Ginger L.: say "no". Even if, for example, one has an expired inspection sticker, one doesn't KNOW that that is the reason for the stop. When questioned by the police: 1. address the police person as "officer", 2. be courteous, 3. answer any question using the minimum number of words possible 4. do not lie 5. never, ever, say more than the minimum response to the question 6. I was told by one person, that she/he, if stopped at night, while driving a vehicle: a. turned on the vehicle's dome light, and, b. place her/his hands atop the steering wheel 7. if asked for license and registration, tell the officer where the item is, and await a response 8. a judgment call, but if the officer replies, one might risk saying, "Oh. I understand, have learned a lesson and it will never happen again". Notes: 1. never plead guilty to a traffic ticket as it is written. Always contact a lawyer and request that she/he write to the prosecutor asking if a plea to a reduced charge (preferably a "no-point violation) would be acceptable in satisfaction of the more serious charge. Such is often successful, since the prosecutor: a. is credited with a conviction, and, b. can close the file without the investment of additional time. 2. if available, take a remedial safe-driving course, particularly if doing so will remove a certain number of points from one's driving record. 3. it has become most difficult to enter Canada with any sort of conviction whatsoever. A waiver may, in some instances, be obtained, which involves: a. a payment in four figures, and, b. one year's wait. 4. having once been stopped for a traffic matter, I politely suggested to the officer, that for her/his safety, she/he should have parked the police car further into the traffic lane to avoid being hit by a car traveling in the same direction.
  • "Why, officer--DWB?"

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