ANSWERS: 6
  • What is ptsd?
  • Well, it's pretty hard to "let go" of it when you have PTSD, I say this from experience. Whether you like it or not (and chances are, you wouldn't), you'll have flashbacks and dissociative episodes. It's not a choice to have this happen to you. The best thing for him to do would probably be either to go to a therapist that specializes in PTSD, or get some books/workbooks on dealing with your PTSD and healing from whatever caused it (there are a good amount of those). I think the best thing you'd be able to do is try to understand how he feels and don't tell him to get over it and the such.
  • All I can say, jamesdeangirl, is that you ought to stop "helping" men. Either they deal with their stuff or not. Do you want a relationship with this person? If yes, then listen but don't try to help. I'd just get a new one. You can't change a man and you can't hold him by making him feel guilty. You ought to do what men do: find someone you really LIKE and let that be the only measure.
  • He can seek professional counseling, look into medication and also alternative therapies for anxiety relief. From my own experience, I would say, be a friend to him, but don't invest yourself. You will be disappointed.
  • These are probably not panic attacks but are ptsd stress attacks which are different. It's like a flashback to another time and he is reacting to someone else, not you. You cannot help him, and you cannot cure him. He must learn about his ptsd in order to overcome it. You can cause him more damage by trying to play amateur psychoanalyst with him. Life can be very difficult for friends and family of those with ptsd because we tend to push people away out of fear of being hurt.
  • You can't fix him. Don't think you can. Support him as much as you can, but when it becomes too much, walk away. If he can't move on, he'll drag you down with him. You're not abandoning him by leaving, you're saving yourself.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy