ANSWERS: 9
  • veterinarian
  • I wasn't. I was rubbing his belly because it soothes him
  • When a dog gets an erection, his penis enlarges into a strange shape, that includes larger areas where you describe the lumps. It is probably part of his penis. I believe it is intended to lock his penis into the bitch to guarantee insemination.
  • Yes, normal in a dog with an erection.
  • I can't believe how ignorant some peoples answers are on here. When a male dog roles onto his back you can see the anatomy. Although its not actually the 'penis' you see it is the shaft AND my puppy just got neutured so I am wondering the same thing because when he rolled over (because like most dogs )he wanted his belly rubbed there were two small round pea sized lumps between his incision and th start of his shaft.( he is a small dog under5lbs) There is nothing perverse about noticing lumps on your dog. If you don't know the answer and you obviously don't know about male dogs...why bother replying? AND if you (guy with the St.B) have a male dog I find your answer very odd. Your dog did't have two litters,he was just a stud for the bitch who had the two litters. WHat does this have to do with the question? Studding your dog out twice doesn't make you an expert on his anatomy(you made that was pretty clear by your comment) Thanks very much to the person who actually ANSWERED the question. And thanks to the person who asked the same question I needed an answer to. I was thinking maybe they botched the surgery.
  • I can't believe how ignorant some peoples answers are on here. When a male dog roles onto his back you can see the anatomy. Although its not actually the 'penis' you see it is the shaft AND my puppy just got neutured so I am wondering the same thing because when he rolled over (because like most dogs )he wanted his belly rubbed there were two small round pea sized lumps between his incision and th start of his shaft.( he is a small dog under5lbs) There is nothing perverse about noticing lumps on your dog. If you don't know the answer and you obviously don't know about male dogs...why bother replying? AND if you (guy with the St.B) have a male dog I find your answer very odd. Your dog did't have two litters,he was just a stud for the bitch who had the two litters. WHat does this have to do with the question? Studding your dog out twice doesn't make you an expert on his anatomy(you made that was pretty clear by your comment) Thanks very much to the person who actually ANSWERED the question. And thanks to the person who asked the same question I needed an answer to. I was thinking maybe they botched the surgery.
  • What you saw sort of 'ties' the male to the female to help insure impregnation. I think the common terminology is 'knot'. But yeah, your canine companion is fine.
  • Don't listen to the dumb@ss answers that chastise you for paying too much attention to your dog's anatomy. Responsible, caring pet owners regularly examine their animals and watch for abnormalities and changes. That's how we know if something seems wrong. Good on you for taking notice and worrying. I used to wonder about this same thing with my neutered male.
  • There is nothing wrong or perverted about looking over your dog, even once a month to be sure that all is well and right. When I pet, massage, brush my dog...or cats...it is a prime opportunity to become aware of what is NORMAL and what is NOT. Just as an intelligent human is aware of their own body, it is imperative that pet owners are aware of what is NORMAL on their animals. Just as some older dogs can get "fatty lumps" that are not cancerous...if the owner doesn't keep track and know what lumps the vet has indicated are not a worry, and which ones require keeping track of...HOW DO YOU SUPPOSE TO KNOW, IF YOU DON'T CHECK OUT YOUR DOG? Women, with intelligence, do a hands on monthly breast exam...so that we KNOW what's normal and what is not...most men jolly well know what is normal and what may not be...with regards to their genitalia...HOW? By checking! YOUR GOOD HEALTH AND THAT OF YOUR COMPANION ANIMAL IS NOT JUST THE RESPONSIBILITY OF YOUR VET OR DOCTOR...IT STARTS WITH EACH OF US!

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