ANSWERS: 8
  • I thought it came from the word grunt.. as if displeased. Edit - From grunting and grumbling is what I just checked in the dictionary.. discontent
  • Disgruntled is the past tense of disgruntle... disgruntle 1682, from dis- "entirely, very" + obs. gruntle "to grumble," frequentative of grunt (q.v.). Hope that helps.
  • Dis + Gruntle From Middle English, Gruntelen Frequentive of Grunten, to Grunt, or Utter Deep Gutteral Sound of Disgust.... sort of like Oy Vey, when I get aggravated. source: Dictionary.com
  • You got this from the promo of the new The Office episode, didn't you?
  • I heard it's from medieval times, when, the story goes, an aristocrat riding by one of his vassals could expect to be greeted with little more than a grunt, unless the poor man had a complaint, in which case, he'd actually speak. From this mocking observation came the upper class use of disgruntled for any poor soul with a grievance. Because the word, to this day, slightly insinuates inferior status, this story makes sense, though I regret I have no reference.
  • I read it's rooted in medieval England, an age when an aristocrat, the story goes, mockingly complained whenever he rode by one of his vassals, he'd be greeted with a grunt, unless the poor man had a complaint, in which case, he'd actually speak. Hence, he was said to be disgruntled, a pejorative word that became widely used by the upper class . Because the word, to this day, slightly insinuates inferior status, this story makes sense, though I'm sorry I can't find a reference.
  • is word origin a dying trade for the average speaker? let's say that i wanted to get my new word discreamled recognized by webster... i think a scream would be more than a grunt☺
  • And are you gruntled yet? The "dis" of disgruntled is not the same as the "dis" of "dismayed." It means "completely", and so "gruntled," just as it sounds, is an old word that means "grumbling." Today, however, "gruntled" has found its way into dictionaries as a word in its own right. If you look at the origin, you will see that it gives "gruntled" as a back-formation from "disgruntled." People assumed that "disgruntled" was a negative and invented the word "gruntled." Similar back-formations add new words to the English dictionary every year. One of the most well-known as a back-formation is "edit, " which arose because the word "editor" sounds as if it should mean "one who edits." http://www.esmerel.com/circle/wordlore/gruntled.html

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