ANSWERS: 22
  • The company for whom I worked paid my tuition for college. It was a wonderful benefit of my employment with that company. I paid for graduate and law school.
  • No parental help, for the money at least..
  • I paid my own way and worked a full time job while attending college full time.
  • I got state grants and some student loans and I'm doing it all myself, butt busting is occurring right now *lol*
  • I was a butt-buster, my parents could not afford to pay for any of us four kids.
  • government paid for it
  • Neither. Uncle Sam and the US military covered it.
  • My parents paid it, and I busted my butt so I could have and drive a car, get things I wanted and needed (not for school), etc.
  • No I don't get any help from my parents. I go to school with scholarships and financial aid.
  • A little of both, I'm paying for about a third of it now and my parents cover the balance of each semester. I am and will be paying them back for some time but it helps me to borrow from them (they won't charge interest or late fees) and they don't mind because they offered to just pay for my education anyway but I didn't feel right accepting that when it would only take a little sacrifice for me to pay for it myself in just a few years.
  • I was dependant on myself, until I couldn`t do it anymore, three years down the drain!!
  • I paid for it all by myself. I was a big girl.
  • misbehaved badly in school. So came to college as a mature student on release from work part time. Did Dip Ed, Dip sw. Psychology A level nights. Post Qualifying couse as a part time student in my own time. Still studying. Perpetual student, thats me!
  • My parents paid for my first two years tuition, and sometimes helped me out with utility bills in those years. After that, I was on my own and paid the tuition, accomodation, and all those lovely costs with loans and working in restaurants and clubs.
  • Self-funded, no one in the family was in a position to help out.
  • I had a scholarship, but my parents also paid the costs of my education.
  • I was married when I was in college and so I worked part time, took out loans and struggled but I did it.
  • Butt busting, but part of that was earning a Presidential scholarship.
  • I worked and went to school at the same time.
  • I got some scholarships and worked. My parents could not afford to send me to college.
  • My parents generously paid all of my college expenses.
  • Given that I got into an elite university that offers extremely generous financial aid, you might say that I did it myself -- by busting my butt to earn top grades, among other things. In fact, my aid package included a parental contribution, which my parents paid, a student contribution, which was the money I was expected to earn in summer and work-study jobs, and a small loan obligation. The parental/student contributions and the loan burden were not onerous, because the outright grant was so large, and I repaid the loans myself. I did not expect my parents to do it. Later, another elite university awarded me a large fellowship to earn my PhD. It comprised tuition and fees plus a stipend for living expenses. My parents didn't pay one cent towards my graduate degree, and I didn't need to take out any loans either. My point is that if you are academically and otherwise qualified, you should not hesitate to apply to the most elite universities in the nation out of fear of the cost. Because they are the best-endowed, they offer by far the best financial aid.

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