ANSWERS: 19
  • In like Flynn Meaning To be quickly and/or emphatically successful, usually in a sexual or romantic context. Origin in like flynnThis phrase is commonly said to be a reference to Errol Flynn, the Australian film actor. Flynn was famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and for his flamboyant private life. His reputation as a hard-drinking, hell-raising ladies' man was apparently well justified, although it has doubtless been enhanced by his delight in playing up to his image. For instance, he entitled his autobiography - My Wicked, Wicked Ways and also did nothing to dispel the incredible but nonetheless widespread rumours as to the the size of his penis and the number of women who had shared his bed. Flynn was acquitted in February 1943 for the statutory rape of a teenage girl. The word in had been used with regard to success, good fortune or sexual conquest for some years prior to the 1940s. For example: John Mills' Life Race-Horse, 1854: "The handicapper ... considerately classed me among the middle ones, and awarded 6 st. 12 lb. as my burthen. 'He's vell in,' said my owner, 'very vell in.'" Alfred Mason's Clementina, 1901: "His luck for the moment was altogether in." E. Wilson's Twenties, 1923: "Well, did Mr. Wilson get it in tonight?" All of the above might lead us to believe that origin of the phrase 'in like Flynn' is clear. As so often though, things aren't quite as tidy as they might first seem. The earliest recorded use of the phrase is in a December 1946 edition of American Speech: "In like Flynn, everything is O.K. In other words, the pilot is having no more trouble than Errol Flynn has in his cinematic feats." That doesn't have the sexual connotations that the phrase acquired later. There's also an earlier, albeit oblique, reference from 1942 - in The San Francisco Examiner (Sports section): "Answer these questions correctly and your name is Flynn, meaning you're in, provided you have two left feet and the written consent of your parents." Errol Flynn's particular notoriety as someone especially likely to be 'in' in a sexual sense came about after his trial in 1943, although he was already known as a screen romantic lead. If the phrase does derive from his name then it appears to have been coined in regard to his all-round flamboyance and fame - which were both considerable by 1942 - rather than specifically his sexual success. Another possible figure who could plausibly have been the source of the phrase is the political organizer Edward J. Flynn. He was a campaign manager for the Democratic party during the 1930s and 40s and was well-known to be highly effective at arranging political successes. Such machiavellian organizers were known as bosses. Flynn, with some irony, called his autobiography 'You're the Boss', in a reference to the American voting public. Edward J. Flynn had not been associated with the phrase 'in like Flynn' prior to the efforts by etymologists to explain it though and no records from the 1940s make any such link. It seems very much more likely that Errol Flynn is the Flynn in question and, although the phrase may have been used before he was at the peak of his celebrity, it became well-known by association with him. The 1967 James Coburn starred in the film, In Like Flint. This was a sequel to the 1966 Our Man Flint and presumably the screenwriters, on the lookout for another 'Flint' phrase, opted for a play on 'In like Flynn'. There's now some confusion between the two phrases and some use 'In like Flint' as if it were synonymous with 'In like Flynn'. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/198700.html
  • Errol Flynn See http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/378834 for the origin of the expression.
  • Errol Flynn, a movie star who was popular in the late 1930's and throughout the 1940's. In 1942, there was a sensational trial involving two teenage girls he took out on his yacht and they charged him with statutory rape. The trial generated national headlines. The phrase was especially popular during World War II with American GI's. Its use is continued today. Flynn was an Aussie. He had quite a sense of humor.
  • Flynn is the 3rd sting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers G-FORCE. go pack! Have a BLAST!
  • I think it originally referred to Errol Flynn, the famous and very popular actor of the thirties and forties. He was reputed to be one of the most prolific "actors" with the ladies, both on and off screen. Some have said he would put Warren Beatty to shame.
  • I found a link for you but I see a lot of people have already answered it. But what the hell here you go.http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/198700.html
  • i'm so glad you asked this question!!! i always wondered until now.....isn't it great to have ab!!! lol
  • dont know but he's in for sure! LOL! what is he in though? ;D
  • Earl Flynn
  • I did not know so I did a Google search and this is what I was able to find. . http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/198700.html . I copied and pasted here for you to see . In like Flynn . Meaning . To be quickly and/or emphatically successful, usually in a sexual or romantic context. . Origin . in like flynnThis phrase is commonly said to be a reference to Errol Flynn, the Australian film actor. Flynn was famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and for his flamboyant private life. His reputation as a hard-drinking, hell-raising ladies' man was apparently well justified, although it has doubtless been enhanced by his delight in playing up to his image. For instance, he entitled his autobiography - My Wicked, Wicked Ways and also did nothing to dispel the incredible but nonetheless widespread rumours as to the the size of his penis and the number of women who had shared his bed. Flynn was acquitted in February 1943 for the statutory rape of a teenage girl. . The word in had been used with regard to success, good fortune or sexual conquest for some years prior to the 1940s. For example: . John Mills' Life Race-Horse, 1854: "The handicapper ... considerately classed me among the middle ones, and awarded 6 st. 12 lb. as my burthen. 'He's vell in,' said my owner, 'very vell in.'" . Alfred Mason's Clementina, 1901: "His luck for the moment was altogether in." . E. Wilson's Twenties, 1923: "Well, did Mr. Wilson get it in tonight?" . All of the above might lead us to believe that origin of the phrase 'in like Flynn' is clear. As so often though, things aren't quite as tidy as they might first seem. The earliest recorded use of the phrase is in a December 1946 edition of American Speech: . "In like Flynn, everything is O.K. In other words, the pilot is having no more trouble than Errol Flynn has in his cinematic feats." . That doesn't have the sexual connotations that the phrase acquired later. There's also an earlier, albeit oblique, reference from 1942 - in The San Francisco Examiner (Sports section): . "Answer these questions correctly and your name is Flynn, meaning you're in, provided you have two left feet and the written consent of your parents." . Errol Flynn's particular notoriety as someone especially likely to be 'in' in a sexual sense came about after his trial in 1943, although he was already known as a screen romantic lead. If the phrase does derive from his name then it appears to have been coined in regard to his all-round flamboyance and fame - which were both considerable by 1942 - rather than specifically his sexual success. . Another possible figure who could plausibly have been the source of the phrase is the political organizer Edward J. Flynn. He was a campaign manager for the Democratic party during the 1930s and 40s and was well-known to be highly effective at arranging political successes. Such machiavellian organizers were known as bosses. Flynn, with some irony, called his autobiography 'You're the Boss', in a reference to the American voting public. . Edward J. Flynn had not been associated with the phrase 'in like Flynn' prior to the efforts by etymologists to explain it though and no records from the 1940s make any such link. It seems very much more likely that Errol Flynn is the Flynn in question and, although the phrase may have been used before he was at the peak of his celebrity, it became well-known by association with him. . The 1967 James Coburn starred in the film, In Like Flint. This was a sequel to the 1966 Our Man Flint and presumably the screenwriters, on the lookout for another 'Flint' phrase, opted for a play on 'In like Flynn'. There's now some confusion between the two phrases and some use 'In like Flint' as if it were synonymous with 'In like Flynn'. Copyright © Gary Martin, 1996 - 2009
  • Errol Flynn, the swashbuckling movie actor.
  • I think this is a misquote when it is supposed to be "in like Flint", which is from a movie with James Colburn. It means to be in a flavorable position. In like Flynn just doesn't make sense.
  • Flynn was a big slut at my highschool. makes sense...
  • I've always heard it as "In like Flint". Mine is quite possibly derived from yours and a variation caused by the movie "In like Flint". The meaning in my context is that you are accepted into a group or into a woman's life (sometimes in a sexual context).
  • Yes, he certainly was the lover-boy of his time ""This phrase is commonly said to be a reference to Errol Flynn, the Australian film actor. Flynn was famous for his romantic swashbuckler roles in Hollywood films and for his flamboyant private life. His reputation as a hard-drinking, hell-raising ladies' man was apparently well justified, although it has doubtless been enhanced by his delight in playing up to his image. For instance, he entitled his autobiography - My Wicked, Wicked Ways and also did nothing to dispel the incredible but nonetheless widespread rumours as to the the size of his penis and the number of women who had shared his bed... http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/198700.html
  • I've only heard it as "in like Flint."
  • Here's a few more you can spread around in Georgia: "The early dog catches the worm." "Dream on little dreamsicle." "You don't always get what you had." "Up your nose with a rubber chicken." "Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and despised." "Make hay while the bum shines." "A penny saved is a peny burned." "If you don't like it, lumpy gravy." "No skin off my ear." "If it's worth doing, it's worth doing left." "Kiss my tuba." "Blow it out yout kazoo"
  • Okay, I'll bite. What does this mean? I mean I get the Flynn answer everyone gave, but what has this to do with Elves and the reference from the other question?
  • I never heard it and I'm old..I know one other that's very popular. In like flint,As good as it gets. If you are a rich, stay at home dad, you're in like Flint.

Copyright 2017, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy