ANSWERS: 8
  • Liberty City, the last interaction I had was indirect one of my employees had his car stolen while visiting family their and staying overnight.
  • I AM one of the people who live in that area.
  • We live in Hemet, California now..we moved here last November. It is basically a retirement community so we haven't really noticed any impoverished area. We moved from Riverside and on the east side in that city there are some gangs, graffiti and rundown/trashed buildings. There was more violence in that area and of course we tried to stay far away from it! :(
  • I was shot while walking home from work since I walked by a drug deal that was going on in public and they thought I was too close for comfort
  • I live in a small city and 75% of the citizens are elderly and low income so it's kind of hard to pick a specific area..I live in a complex that is all elderly. Unfortunately we also have no resources here. we have no food banks, no places like catholic charities to help with bills..nothing so everyone is pretty much on our own and we are all on entergy which is country electric so bills are outrageous. Even though most people are on low income housing, most get only $10 a month in food stamps if any. and of course, the only groceries store in this area are really expensive.
  • The word I can use to describe some of the most impoverished areas of my city is 'DESPAIR'. That perhaps would give you an idea-more or less-of what I'm talking about. I do interact with them five times a month. I do voluntary work counselling inner-city kids and I can tell you it's emotionally draining.
  • In the most impoverished area of our town, old buildings are boarded up, and filled with trash and rats, because homeless people break in so they will have a place to hide from the thugs roaming loose and beating them up. Many people live in tents under bushes next to the two major rivers we have, because the rangers protect them. They often congregate around the biggest food bank/soup kitchen we have. I read recently that we have nearly 3,000 homeless now. We did have an amusing story in our local paper. A reporter was on a bus with some Russians who were visiting for a symposium. They asked the driver to show them the worst part of town. While they were driving through the very worst part we have, the reporter heard them say (in their own language)"They are afraid to show us the bad part".
  • There are many different levels of poverty and I have lived in every level, from living in a car as a child and in tents along with other homeless individuals; owning no television, phone, car, toilet, refrigerator, air conditioner, heater, and/or any other kind of electronic devices. Showering in public bathrooms, and in sprinklers, getting drinking water from campground pumps or rivers... cooking meat in a hole my father dug in the ground. Then there was the kind of poverished where we lived in apartments that were run down and had electricity, refrigerators, and all those other above mentioned amenities. There was the time we lived in trailers and once we lived in a home made shack. To be honest the only time I consider anything "getto" is when the inhabitants who consider themselves poverished when they are really just poor, take to crime, drug dealing, stealing, graffiti-ing people homes and so forth, all for a false sense of power over their situation. I have also lived in so call rich neighborhoods, where all my neighbors were Doctors and Lawyers and such, and money did not change them for the better. There kids were more trouble then the kids from the lower income places I have lived. And they had the money to pay other kids to do bad things to the not as rich and/or liked children. All in all, I think people, not money make a neighborhood a bad or good place to live. If you want a true comparison you can just travel around any major city and view the changes around each corner.

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