ANSWERS: 36
  • I'm almost positive it was the movie "The Wizard of Oz"**. You may know the part when Dorothy enters the "new world" ("I don't think we're in Kansas anymore") and everything turns from black and white to color. From what I've heard, people were greatly surprised when it happened; if any other movie included color before that movie, then the shock would not have been so great. **UPDATE 8/16/04: The person who said it was the 1938 movie "Gone With The Wind" is correct. Thanks for correcting me.
  • The answer is the "Wizard of Oz". My parents always said that it was so amazing to see color when she came out of the tornado. 100 % Sure.
  • The first film to be made with color was made in 1908. It is called A Visit To The Seaside. It was 8 minutes long. The first full length movie to use color was The World, The Flesh And The Devil from 1914
  • 1936 - "Trail of the lonesome pine" Starring Fred McMurray was the first film to be shot in Three-Strip Technicolor outside of a studio environment (on location). Hence, the first traditionally known color talking movie.
  • Gone with the Wind did not come out until 1939. The Wizard of Oz was the first movie to use color. It competed against Gone with the Wind the Academy Award for best picture, but lost.
  • The first film to use modern color was 1917 "The Gulf Between" produced by Technicolor.
  • George Eastman showed the first movie in Technicolor (Rochester NY) 6/4/1929 but the technique was not used widely mostly because of war and the depression . In 1936 came the development of Kodachrome, the first color multi-layered color film. Previous to this nothing was full color as we know it today. A gala premiere was held for Gone with the wind in Atlanta on December 15, 1939. The final, edited film for The Wizard of Oz was shown at the Strand Theatre in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin on August 12, 1939. So technically The Wizard of Oz was the first Full Color movie ever show to wide audiances
  • 'A Visit to the Seaside' Made in the UK in 1908 in Kinemacolor by G.A. Smith of Brighton. 'The Wizard Of Oz' was done in Technicolour. Technicolour was invented by Herbert T. Kalmus in 1917, and wasn't the first process to colour film by decades.
  • Color movies were expensive and difficult to produce, and so displaced black-and-white films far more slowly than "talkies" had replaced silent films. By 1954, just half of all films were being made in color. Kinemacolor was an early color process developed by George Albert Smith of Brighton, England in 1906. Leon Douglass of San Rafael, California, perfected a color process and produced breathtaking color travelogues, as well as a feature-length color film, Cupid Angling, with Ruth Roland in 1918. His process became one of the factors in the formation of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation, which came to dominate the industry in the 1930s and '40s.The Technicolor process required a special camera that split the image and recorded on three strips of black and white film simultaneously. Red, green, and blue filters were used to filter the light to the three strips respectively. A proprietary printing process translated the images from the developed strips into the color prints projected in the theatres. The process worked well, but was more complex and expensive than black and white. For more information, you can go to the following web site http://www.moah.org/exhibits/archives/movies/technology_development.html The Wizard of Oz, was not the first color movie http://www.widescreenmuseum.com/oldcolor/
  • The first shorts to use color were done in the late 1890's but were only color tinted. The first full length feature natural color film was "The World, the Flesh and the Devil". This movie was shot using Kinemacolor.
  • NOTE: Nobody really knows what the first color movie was I add this note to save time for the hundreds of people in search of the answer. Color films have been made by one technique or another since the 1890's. Yes it's true! One thing is sure, it was not the Wizard of Oz or Gone With the wind! (www.Widescreenmuseum.com) Although it had won 3 oscars, had a cast of well established and major stars and literally set the bar for popularity at it's release, "The Adventures Of Robin Hood" is seldom remembered for what it is. Released To National and international audiences in the spring of 1938. Far more than a year before the August 12th release of The Wizard Of Oz in 1939 and coming three months short of 2 years before Gone With The Wind's December 15th 1939 Premiere, "The Adventures Of Robin Hood" was the First major motion picture wide released in full spectrum color as we know it today. Although the three strip Technicolor technique had been used before in shorts and cartoons and with some quality in long one reeler's Such as: "Trail of The Lonsome Pine" It had Not been used in a major Big budget film and never before with such high quality. To be sure; Neither The Wizard Of Oz, Gone With The Wind OR The Adventures Of Robin Hood were the Very first color films ever made. But...as far as recognised Big budget major motion picture clasics..."The adventures of Robin Hood" came First, The Wizard Of Oz second, and Gone With The Wind third.
  • A 1918 silent film called "Cupid Angling" was the first color movie, although "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone With the Wind" always seem to be mistaken as the correct answer. See http://www.cool-movie-trivia.com/Question_Answers_08_10_03.htm
  • google it kid
  • Wizard of oz, the beginnig in black and white, the rest in color.
  • "The first film to be made with color was made in 1908. It is called A Visit To The Seaside. It was 8 minutes long. The first full length movie to use color was The World, The Flesh And The Devil from 1914." "A very successful full length British documentary "The Delhi Durbar was filmed in color in 1912." http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/7698
  • OH dear how many stupid answers... Officially, the first full length three strip Technicolor film is "Becky Sharp" from 1935. About ten full length colour features were produced before "Robin Hood" or the other films mentioned. But a lot of films in the 20s and even before featured amazingly beautiful colours. "Toll of the Sea", 1922, is a good example and you can find it on DVD. Before Technicolor, there was a company called Kinemacolor. The first motion picture exhibited in Kinemacolor was an eight-minute short filmed in Brighton titled "A Visit to the Seaside", which was trade shown in September 1908. On 26 February 1909, the general public first saw Kinemacolor in a program of 21 short films shown at the Palace Theatre in London. In 1910, Kinemacolor released the first dramatic film made in the process, Checkmated. Kinemacolor projectors were eventually installed in some 300 cinemas in Britain, and 54 dramatic films were produced. Even famous actors and actresses such as Lillian Russell appeared in colour. Four dramatic short films were also produced by Kinemacolor in the United States in 1912-1913 and one in Japan, Yomodsune Sembon Zakura (1914). But even Kinemacolor wasn't pioneering the use of colour. On DVD "British Empire in Colour", there is a short scene which is actually filmed in 1907 and looks pretty good - I suspect that must be the oldest surviving color footage in existence.
  • The first movie to ever come out in color was 'The Gulf Between' from 1917
  • The first movie to ever come out in color was 'The Gulf Between' from 1917. Although most people think that 'The Adventures of Robin Hood' from 1938 was the first
  • Calvin's dad explains it best: C: Dad, how come old photographs are always black and white? Didn't they have color film back then? D: Sure they did. In fact, those old photographs ARE in color. It's just the WORLD was black and white then. C: Really? D: Yep. The world didn't turn color until sometime in the 1930s, and it was pretty grainy color for a while, too. C: That's really weird. D: Well, truth is stranger than fiction. C: But then why are old PAINTINGS in color?! If the world was black and white, wouldn't artists have painted it that way? D: Not necessarily. A lot of great artists were insane. C: But... but how could they have painted in color anyway? Wouldn't their paints have been shades of gray back then? D: Of course, but they turned colors like everything else in the '30s. C: So why didn't old black and white photos turn color too? D: Because they were color pictures of black and white, remember?
  • This really depends on what your definition of a film is, but regardless, the English inventor Charles Durban's Kinemacolor process seems to have had most "firsts" in this area. He released a theatrical dramatic film in 1910, "Checkmated". In 1912, a 2 and half hour color documentary was shown to British audiences, "The Durbar at Delhi". And in 1914, "The World, the Flesh, and the Devil" was the first feature film released in color. See more about Kinemacolor at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinemacolor
  • The first technicolor feature was Becky Sharp in 1935. The story about color film coming out after The Wizard of Oz began shooting is a legend. Neither the Wizard of Oz nor Gone with the Wind was the first by a longshot.
  • "Battleship Potemkin" by Eisenstein. The flag on the ship was hand-painted red.
  • I am assuming that this question means color and not Technicolor. If this is the case then I would have to say that The Great Train Robbery released in 1903 was the first motion picture to use color. People tried incorporate color in the movie by coloring directly on the film, which caused trails of color from the images while the movie played. I regret that I do not have a source to cite. However, I did take the History of Film in collge and this was one of the topics. I am not sure if the movie was released in black and white then later with color. I do know it exists though. I had to watch it in class. I hope this post is helpful.
  • You have to rephrase the question, because first from the beginning to technicolor there where diffrent kinds of techniques to provide color movies one fo the was called tinting which was the process of adding color to a black and white film, they simply dipped the film in color, which meant the whole shot was in one color (Ex: The adventures of Prince Achmet (1923)). Other techniques include Tricolor,Agfacolor Technicolor experimented with tinting to put it to better use. Then there were several other techniques as well. If your question is which movie was the first colored one by technicolor company that it is certainly not The Wizared of Oz and not Gone with the Wind, BUT Becky Sharp (1935). As for the first movie in color no matter the technique it would be "A Visit To The Seaside" (1908)with Kinemacolor, this should be correct if I remember it all correctly.
  • Moti b Gidvani directed the first colored feature film called" Kisan Kanya it was released in 1938 in hindi
  • I am sorry. Most of the answers given are wrong. There were many 2-colour movies in the 20s and 30s, including, famously, The Phantom of the Opera, and Ben Hur. The Adventures of Robin Hood was 2-colour. The first 3-colour major movie was Becky Sharp (1935), not much remembered now. The first 3-colour major movie to still be shown today (and possibly only the second one made) was The Garden of Allah (1936) which starred Marlene Dietrich and Charles Boyer in the lead roles, supported by Basil Rathbone, C Aubry Smith and John Carradine. It has been TV in the UK at least three times in the last 10 years, so nobody should be mistakenly saying the The Wizard of Oz or Gone with the Wind.
  • "Cupid Angling" is the first PHOTOPLAY! which is a story told through a seris of pictures. That is not a film my friend :) the first full length film to be done in color was actually Walt Disney's "Snow White." The first live action film done in color was "Wizard of Oz"
  • Sorry, it was a film called "Becky Sharp." It was first Technicolor full feature film ever made in 1935
  • Actually it is called "Photo Drama of Creation." The film is in Color, has Sound and motion picture. It was 4 parts in 8 hours. Made back in 1914.
  • the first color movie without sound was " cupid angling " in 1918
  • Star Wars: Episode V
  • Your question is vague as the word 'movie' just refers to moving images. It covers a wide range from experimental, to small scale productions right up to major Hollywood releases. You need to more specific as you are getting dates from the 1890's to the 1930's.
  • one of the first movies to make total use of colour was the waxworks in the 30s
  • A Visit to the Seaside (1908) was the first successful film in natural color and the film was filmed with Kinemacolor.
  • flowers and trees how did u not know that u stupid piece of sheeit dumbfock
  • It seems to me that the oldest known feature film in colour. (not counting documentaries, shorts, and so on) was Joan the Woman (1916) YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uggNakCumWM

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