ANSWERS: 45
  • Ok, I asked him. He says his real name is Steve.
  • the hebrew word is ELI or ELOHIM depending on the tense. arimaic is ELAW. arabic it's ALLAH [muslim and christians alike]
  • It's "I Am"
  • God is whomever He chooses to reveal Himself to be. God said I AM that I AM
  • Joe Hovah.
  • There are two names used for the true God in the Hebrew (from which all of the names derive) depending on the context. In context of God's love he is called Yaweh (I am) Hebrew: YHVH. In the context of his power and might he is Elohim. Both are names of God. Jehovah is actually a corruption of Yaweh.
  • YHWH seems to confuse people. Information I have says this spelling omits the vowels because evout Jews believe His name is to be so revered that it should not be uttered, hence, the all-consonant spelling. In the Bible, where God refers to himself as "I AM", the Herbrew word being used is Yahweh, his personal name. You need to look at the original Scripts to see the Hebrew words used. Other names for God are mentioned there as well. As far as "speaking King James" God's word was written in the common language of the day, consequently later translations were written in the language of the day of different countries. King James' Bible was the modern, English translation of its day. Only problem is, with translations of translations, you tend to lose the meaning of the original Hebrew or Greek Scriptures. When you study those old manuscripts, it is surprising the depth of meaning you find. Want to explore more? Get a good Greek-Hebrew lexicon Bible, with key words highlighted, or ask your nearest Bible scholar. Digging for knowledge like this is fun and enlightening. It would compare to seeing the persoinal notes of the framers of the Constitution, to read what their mindset was.
  • Joe Pesci
  • I tried. He's not talking to me. I must have done something wrong again.
  • Well, I call on god's name as Jehovah. Especially since I'm a Jehovah's Witness and I study the bible with people at their home (and some that have demon problems in their homes) I have seen quite often on first hand how demons flee from Jehovah's name when you call on it. I even had a friend who is also a witness that was talking to this one girl about god and the bible. He knew her from school and knew that she practiced witchcraft and rituals to summon demons and stuff of that nature at her house. But as soon as he brought up Jehovah's name she got angry. She already knew about God and his name Jehovah from her connections with the demons. (Because remember, the bible says demons were at one time angels under god) After that I had no doubt. My little sister had a similar experience (she was a Junior in high school at the time). On of the boy in her lunch period was having demon problems everynight. He had lots of items in his house from African tribes and witch doctors, anyway, the demons would appear to him everynight and sometimes threaten him. Only his parents didn't believe him. He knew my sister was a Jehovah Witness and he talk to her about it. She showed him scriptures in the bible that show God's name and scriptures that showed that demons flee from that name. The next night the demons appeared to him he called on that name, he said the demon screamed loud enough to wake everyone in the house at 1:30 at night then disappeared. He came into school the next day yelling, "it worked, it worked" Psalms 83:18 - "That people may know that you, whose name is Jehovah, You alone are the Most High over all the earth." Isaiah 12:2 - "Look! God is my salvation. I shall trust and be in no dread; for Jah Jehovah is my strength and [my] might, and he came to be the salvation of me.” This was also a good article on God's name: God’s Name—Its Meaning and Pronunciation ONE of the Bible writers asked: “Who has gathered the wind in the hollow of both hands? Who has wrapped up the waters in a mantle? Who has made all the ends of the earth to rise? What is his name and what the name of his son, in case you know?” (Proverbs 30:4) How can we find out what God’s name is? That is an important question. The creation is a powerful proof that God must exist, but it does not tell us his name. (Romans 1:20) In fact, we could never know God’s name unless the Creator himself told us. And he has done that in his own Book, the Holy Bible. On one celebrated occasion, God pronounced his own name, repeating it in the hearing of Moses. Moses wrote an account of that event that has been preserved in the Bible down to our day. (Exodus 34:5) God even wrote his name with his own “finger.” When he had given Moses what we today call the Ten Commandments, God miraculously wrote them down. The record says: “Now as soon as [God] had finished speaking with him on Mount Sinai he proceeded to give Moses two tablets of the Testimony, tablets of stone written on by God’s finger.” (Exodus 31:18) God’s name appears eight times in the original Ten Commandments. (Exodus 20:1-17) Thus God himself has revealed his name to man both verbally and in writing. So, what is that name? *** na p. 6 God’s Name—Its Meaning and Pronunciation *** In the Hebrew language it is written .יהוה These four letters, called the Tetragrammaton, are read from right to left in Hebrew and can be represented in many modern languages as YHWH or JHVH. God’s name, represented by these four consonants, appears almost 7,000 times in the original “Old Testament,” or Hebrew Scriptures. The name is a form of a Hebrew verb ha·wah′ ,)הוה(meaning “to become,” and actually signifies “He Causes to Become.” Thus, God’s name identifies him as the One who progressively fulfills his promises and unfailingly realizes his purposes. Only the true God could bear such a meaningful name. Do you remember the different ways that God’s name appeared in Psalm 83:18, as set out in the previous section (page 5)? Two of those translations had mere titles (“the LORD,” the “Eternal”) as substitutes for God’s name. But in two of them, Yahweh and Jehovah, you can see the four letters of God’s name. However, the pronunciation is different. Why? How Is God’s Name Pronounced? The truth is, nobody knows for sure how the name of God was originally pronounced. Why not? Well, the first language used in writing the Bible was Hebrew, and when the Hebrew language was written down, the writers wrote only consonants—not vowels. Hence, when the inspired writers wrote God’s name, they naturally did the same thing and wrote only the consonants. While ancient Hebrew was an everyday spoken language, this presented no problem. The pronunciation of the Name was familiar to the Israelites and when they saw it in writing they supplied the vowels without thinking (just as, for an English reader, the abbreviation “Ltd.” represents “Limited” and “bldg.” represents “building”). Two things happened to change this situation. First, a superstitious idea arose among the Jews that it was wrong to say the divine name out loud; so when they came to it in their Bible reading they uttered the Hebrew word ’Adho·nai′ (“Sovereign Lord”). Further, as time went by, the ancient Hebrew language itself ceased to be spoken in everyday conversation, and in this way the original Hebrew pronunciation of God’s name was eventually forgotten. In order to ensure that the pronunciation of the Hebrew language as a whole would not be lost, Jewish scholars of the second half of the first millennium C.E. invented a system of points to represent the missing vowels, and they placed these around the consonants in the Hebrew Bible. Thus, both vowels and consonants were written down, and the pronunciation as it was at that time was preserved. When it came to God’s name, instead of putting the proper vowel signs around it, in most cases they put other vowel signs to remind the reader that he should say ’Adho·nai′. From this came the spelling Iehouah, and, eventually, Jehovah became the accepted pronunciation of the divine name in English. This retains the essential elements of God’s name from the Hebrew original. Which Pronunciation Will You Use? Where, though, did pronunciations like Yahweh come from? These are forms that have been suggested by modern scholars trying to deduce the original pronunciation of God’s name. Some—though not all—feel that the Israelites before the time of Jesus probably pronounced God’s name Yahweh. But no one can be sure. Perhaps they pronounced it that way, perhaps not. Nevertheless, many prefer the pronunciation Jehovah. Why? Because it has a currency and familiarity that Yahweh does not have. Would it not, though, be better to use the form that might be closer to the original pronunciation? Not really, for that is not the custom with Bible names. To take the most prominent example, consider the name of Jesus. Do you know how Jesus’ family and friends addressed him in day-to-day conversation while he was growing up in Nazareth? The truth is, no human knows for certain, although it may have been something like Yeshua (or perhaps Yehoshua). It certainly was not Jesus. However, when the accounts of his life were written in the Greek language, the inspired writers did not try to preserve that original Hebrew pronunciation. Rather, they rendered the name in Greek, I·e·sous′. Today, it is rendered differently according to the language of the reader of the Bible. Spanish Bible readers encounter Jesús (pronounced Hes·soos′). Italians spell it Gesù (pronounced Djay·zoo′). And Germans spell it Jesus (pronounced Yay′soos). Must we stop using the name of Jesus because most of us, or even all of us, do not really know its original pronunciation? So far, no translator has suggested this. We like to use the name, for it identifies the beloved Son of God, Jesus Christ, who gave his lifeblood for us. Would it be showing honor to Jesus to remove all mention of his name in the Bible and replace it with a mere title like “Teacher,” or “Mediator”? Of course not! We can relate to Jesus when we use his name the way it is commonly pronounced in our language. Similar comments could be made regarding all the names we read in the Bible. We pronounce them in our own language and do not try to imitate the original pronunciation. Thus we say “Jeremiah,” not Yir·meya′hu. Similarly we say Isaiah, although in his own day this prophet likely was known as Yesha‛·ya′hu. Even scholars who are aware of the original pronunciation of these names use the modern pronunciation, not the ancient, when speaking about them. And the same is true with the name Jehovah. Even though the modern pronunciation Jehovah might not be exactly the way it was pronounced originally, this in no way detracts from the importance of the name. It identifies the Creator, the living God, the Most High to whom Jesus said: “Our Father in the heavens, let your name be sanctified.”—Matthew 6:9. ‘It Cannot Be Supplanted’ While many translators favor the pronunciation Yahweh, the New World Translation and also a number of other translations continue the use of the form Jehovah because of people’s familiarity with it for centuries. Moreover, it preserves, equally with other forms, the four letters of the Tetragrammaton, YHWH or JHVH. Earlier, the German professor Gustav Friedrich Oehler made a similar decision for much the same reason. He discussed various pronunciations and concluded: “From this point onward I use the word Jehovah, because, as a matter of fact, this name has now become more naturalized in our vocabulary, and cannot be supplanted.”—Theologie des Alten Testaments (Theology of the Old Testament), second edition, published in 1882, page 143. Similarly, in his Grammaire de l’hébreu biblique (Grammar of Biblical Hebrew), 1923 edition, in a footnote on page 49, Jesuit scholar Paul Joüon states: “In our translations, instead of the (hypothetical) form Yahweh, we have used the form Jéhovah . . . which is the conventional literary form used in French.” In many other languages Bible translators use a similar form, as indicated in the box on page 8. Is it, then, wrong to use a form like Yahweh? Not at all. It is just that the form Jehovah is likely to meet with a quicker response from the reader because it is the form that has been “naturalized” into most languages. The important thing is that we use the name and declare it to others. “Give thanks to Jehovah, you people! Call upon his name. Make known among the peoples his dealings. Make mention that his name is put on high.”—Isaiah 12:4. Different scholars have different ideas about how the name YHWH was originally pronounced. In The Mysterious Name of Y.H.W.H., page 74, Dr. M. Reisel said that the “vocalisation of the Tetragrammaton must originally have been YeHÅ«àH or YaHÅ«àH.” Canon D. D. Williams of Cambridge held that the “evidence indicates, nay almost proves, that Jāhwéh was not the true pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton . . . The Name itself was probably JÄ€HÔH.”—Zeitschrift für die alttestamentliche Wissenschaft (Periodical for Old Testament Knowledge), 1936, Volume 54, page 269. In the glossary of the French Revised Segond Version, page 9, the following comment is made: “The pronunciation Yahvé used in some recent translations is based on a few ancient witnesses, but they are not conclusive. If one takes into account personal names that include the divine name, such as the Hebrew name of the prophet Elijah (Eliyahou) the pronunciation might just as well be Yaho or Yahou.” In 1749 the German Bible scholar Teller told of some different pronunciations of God’s name he had read: “Diodorus from Sicily, Macrobius, Clemens Alexandrinus, Saint Jerome and Origenes wrote Jao; the Samaritans, Epiphanius, Theodoretus, Jahe, or Jave; Ludwig Cappel reads Javoh; Drusius, Jahve; Hottinger, Jehva; Mercerus, Jehovah; Castellio, Jovah; and le Clerc, Jawoh, or Javoh.” Thus it is evident that the original pronunciation of God’s name is no longer known. Nor is it really important. If it were, then God himself would have made sure that it was preserved for us to use. The important thing is to use God’s name according to its conventional pronunciation in our own language.
  • The God of the Jews does answer to Yahweh, Jehovah, and even just God, but also Adonai, El Shaddai, Elohim, Emmanuel, Alpha and Omega, though the masons refer to Him as Yoho, which is a liberty they take with Yaweh.
  • it's Saul Greenbaum.
  • She's a goddess and her name is Freya. An excerpt from a poem for Her by Galina Krasskova: "...I will summon Her forth with a song of steel, for she is fierce and shows no mercy. The field of combat is as sweet as the battlefield of love, and in both, She is the victor. She is sweetness and fury, molten flame, the sharp edge of a killing blade. She is danger and desire, unquenchable, unstoppable. She will tease and entice, transforming the soul. She is pleasure and pain so deeply bound there is no separation. I hail Freya, Shining Goddess of the Vanir. She blinds with Her beauty, seduces with Her fury..."
  • I got sent to voice mail again.
  • I call Him Daddy, but He also answers when I yell "help!"
  • Yashuha, El donnai, The Great I am, The prince of Peace, the Bright morning star, The Lion of the tribe of Judah, Jesus Christ, There are many names... but Jesus is the name that all other names are subject unto...
  • God is an all purpose name for the Deity. Jesus says we can call Him "Father" or even "Daddy" (as the word 'Abba' means in Aramaic). As Avid-D says, he has called Himself by a number of names throughout the Old Testament, because each of them reveals a part of His character, but not all of it. Names in the Bible have a different function from the western world's idea of names. They reveal character. That is why the Messiah is called "Immanuel" in the Old Testament, which means "El/God with us". Yet, the baby in the New testament is called Jesus = Yah saves. In the New Testament, the name by which we must be saved is JESUS (Acts 4:12).
  • bad syntax: file not found.
  • No, it's Arabic; Allah.
  • Well,I dont know his first name, but his last name is Dammit
  • i asked him and after 15 seconds of nothing he whispered "satan". is this bad?
  • How about YAHAWAH!
  • ... Yahweh is Hebrew you effing moron....
  • I have it in good authority that it's just plain old Bob
  • http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/564112 This has been answered on AB many times by smart people and religious smart people and the question has been asked in many forms also. Please see this AB address for more answers.
  • Unfortunately everyone of the time spent so long trying not to say it they forgot what it was. Ah well, just an unimportant little thing like that, it could happen to anyone, you know....forgetting the name of the ultimate creator of everything, even when you have just spent your entire life grovelling to it, still never mind ay. Mind you he appears to have left his initials behind....YHWH?
  • Ben Roethlisberger. He's the god of the football field.
  • God says to tell you to ask Him yourself.
  • He said to tell you it wasn't your concern at this time. Maybe after you grow up a little.
  • My God is the God: "I AM That I AM". God calls Himself by many names, But I like, "I AM THAT I AM".
  • He said his name's Larry, but his friends call him Whiskers.
  • I will just say shame on you for making fun of the Lord.
  • God (not male) wants to be known as "I am source of all that is." God made flesh is names Jesus. If we get it right, we come to resemble Jesus in our diverse personages. God as sanctifier is Holy Spirit.
  • DOGala is God! DOG backwards is God. Hrm... what a coincidence...
  • What's wrong with you? Every child knows his name is Howard, as in "Our Father who art in heaven, Howard be thy name."
  • JESUS!!!!
  • I did and I heard him say distinctively that his name was Herb
  • HUART - - - " our father HUART in heaven "
  • I call him Father
  • why would you question someone faith and religion? don't you know it's the foundation of their sanity, reasoning and intelligence!
  • If you can hear your god talking to you then you're mentally ill. Grow up and stop talking to your imaginary friend. And stop pretending your religion is the correct one, because there is nothing that makes your religion better or more true than the others. "What's that god? You want me to kill my whole family because they have demons inside them? Well ok you're god so I have to obey you" *kills family*
  • Hey GOD? What's your name? He's not answering.
  • Exodus 3:13 "Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say unto them? 14 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you. 15 And God said moreover unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, the LORD God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations." His name is 'I Am' thats what the tetragram YHWH means. What's in a name? Esther means 'a star' Adam means 'man' I am exists in and of Himself, and is the creator of all things.

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