ANSWERS: 34
  • "Hopsital" instead of "Hospital" was always a source of amusement to my parents. Apparently "Erfent" instead of "elephant" but I can't remember that.
  • I get words mixed up all the time, everyday. I think it's cuz I'm lysdexic.
  • I always said "salt & sipper" instead of pepper and I couldn't say towel, so I would always ask for a tail!
  • I actually do it all the time, and have a problem remembering places real names so I have a language all my own. I say Warwelf intead of Werewolf and Quatchwatch instead of Sasquatch. Our local market is called Country Mart-I call it Crunchy Mart There are several fast food places I don't say right either like, I go to Riki Tiki Tavi instead of Taco Tico, and The Hat Place instead of Arby's. Even now I had to ask my daughter what the real names of the places were so I could tell you the right way! Sad.
  • I have trouble with colloquial. Which is really silly when you consider I can spell the bugger without thinking about it much.
  • i get tongue tied with the word - entreupener so i just avoid saying it.
  • I still to this day call crayolla crayons, crans. My fiance makes fun of me. It doesn't come out right when I call it a crayon. Also, when I was younger I couldn't say Ibuprofin, I would say Ibupofrin
  • soooooooo many words I have messed up. I couldn't say pillow, it came out as "piddow" or "pidder", watermelon was "materwalen", the refrigerator was "fridgiegater" and the remote control was "moten troll". I could go on, but I won't. hehe.
  • I used to have trouble with the colour yellow so i used to call it lellow and i couldnt pronounce chiuaua, i used to call that a chihooahoo
  • I havent had much trouble with any words but a work I notice all people say form for the word foam because our team leader always says it that way and now most people around her say it.
  • Just about anything with an R in it, or specific, I always said it like spepacific.
  • Cordiddle instead of cordial, hopspall instead of hospital, sammich instead of sandwich, callapittar instead of catterpillar and flutterby instead of butterfly. I also called cows moodoggies and to this day I call chickens chookums. In our family we also have our own versions of common names and places. Blanket is blankie (common I think), chicken parmagiana has beome chicken in pyjamas, sausages are snozziges,...gee know that I have to think of them I can't but we use them all the time.....oh well..
  • I still cant say phenonenum ( looks like i cant spell it either ) peace
  • Obfuscation...I have to make several sub-syllable attempts.
  • Well, my half-brother is called Michael, and when I was little I called him Baaboul! Go figure!
  • I never had a real prob with any words, but my cousin used to say "nen-a-mems" for "M&M's", "sispetti" for "spagetti", and "wisbum" for "wisdom". Come to think of it, she flunked gym class too..no lie.
  • As for the little cute ones, Hamburgers were Hangurbers, and spaghetti was guspetti. I still have trouble saying anemone (ah-NEM-oh-knee), and Raspberry is still tough. I say it like RAS-perry, and I never stressed both the p and the b.
  • Literally...it came out something like "lillerllery"
  • I still say oinkment... and capitillar... I am 25.
  • I used to say grill instead of girl. I also had a lithp until I was 8. I couldn't pronounthe my etheth
  • I can't say specific to save my life. I can't even really describe how it comes out because it ends up sounding like I am regurgitating some kind of schnitzel instead of trying to speak English.
  • I say limmon instead of lemon and worsh instead of wash I can't say exacerbate.
  • The word 'anagram' came from Greek anagrammatismos "transposition of letters". The word anagram was originally devised after observations in human psychology. Later it became art of anagramming at the time of the Greek poet Lycophron. The pseudonyms adopted by authors are sometimes transposed forms, more or less exact, of their names; thus "Calvinus" becomes "Alcuinus" (V = U); "Francois Rabelais" = "Alcofribas Nasier"; "Arrigo Boito" = "Tobia Gorrio"; "Edward Gorey" = "Ogdred Weary", = "Regera Dowdy" or = "E. G. Deadworry" (and others); "Vladimir Nabokov" = "Vivian Darkbloom", = "Vivian Bloodmark" or = "Dorian Vivalcomb"; "Bryan Waller Proctor" = "Barry Cornwall, poet"; "Henry Rogers" = "R. E. H. Greyson"; "(Sanche) de Gramont" = "Ted Morgan", and so on. It is to be noted that several of these are "imperfect anagrams", letters having been left out in some cases for the sake of easy pronunciation. For his book Mu Revealed, a spoof on the works of James Churchward, occult writer Raymond Buckland used the pseudonym "Tony Earll", an anagram for "Not Really". Common examples are: Etc ect ask aks best bets task taks asteriks - asterisk brid - bird calavry - cavalry comftable - comfortable foiladge - foliage intorduce - introduce intergal - integral revelant - relevant ekcetera - etcetera Greek philos is reversal of O.E. lufu which is cognate with Telugu word 'olapu'. Seer is reversal of Rishi in Sanskrit and Telugu. The subject of linguistics has taken many of the psychological features of people to find how words get transformed in different tongues. In finding etymological affinities, voiced consonants are to be treated as equivalent to voiceless consonants. Consonant 'c' is sometimes pronounced as 'k' and sometimes as 's'. The velars 'k' and 'g' are at times replaced for one another; hence they be treated as equivalent. The Russians replace 'h' with 'k'. Velars 'ch', 's', 'y' and 'j' are also at times replaced for one another; hence they may be treated as equivalent. The bi-labial consonants 'p', 'b' and 'm' may be treated as equivalent. Since 'p' can some times take the form 'f', the labio-dentals 'f', 'w' and 'v' may be treated as equivalent to 'p'. The consonant 'n' is some times pronounced like 'm' if it appears before a bi-labial consonant. Some Englishman pronounce 'ten pens' as 'tempens' Many ethnic groups, including some in India, do not distinguish between 'd' and 'r'. Some speakers of Britain pronounce the 'r' with a flap which sounds like a very fast 'd'. The Indian city Howdah became Howrah in the mouths of the British. The Libyans confuse between the consonants 'r' and 'l'. The Chinese, and also some children, replace 'r' with 'l'. The Japanese replace 'l' with 'r'. In European languages, the articulation of 'l' and 'r' is indicated by their historical alteration, as in Sarah-Sally, and Katherine-Kathleen, and in the words like 'L. stella' cognate with 'star'. In some cases, 'l' becomes 'n', as in 'want' cognate with 'OE. wyllad'. Some Andhras who speak regional dialects of Telugu replace 'l' with 'n' For some words, a consonant may be lost with the passage of time. For some other words, people may add some consonants to suit their speech habits. The name of Russian writer Chekov known to Americans is spelled Tchekhov by French, Cechov by Italians, Tsechechow by Germans, Tjechov by Swedes and Tchejoff by Spaniards. In the texts of classical Greek writers, ancient Indian city name Patali Putra became Palimbothra or Palibothra, and its king's name Chandra Gupta became Sandrakottos or Androkottos in some works and Xandrames or Agrammes in a few other works. The Indian town names Raja Mahendra Varam and Thiru Anantha Puram became Rajmandry and Trivandrum in the tongues of the British.
  • The word "suggestion" I pronounce it as "suggest-sen". And also "M&M", like what The American Idle said. The best I can pronounce is "m men name".
  • I cannot say crayon. It come out crown and sound French. Also I cannot say "tick and flea collar" to save my ilfe. It has always come out flick and tea.
  • I still pronounce the L in salmon. Those silent letters are tricky :)
  • The word "Cinnamon" STILL eludes me from time to time. It's like my jaw doesn't know when to stop rattling: it comes out "Sillin-nin-im-nim"
  • Fuchsia. I said it "Foocheesa"
  • I pronounced "mule"= meal
  • Yes, In my youth i made a major goof with "Confederate". In High school history we were taught about the American civil war, about how the Union and the Confederates fought. Only at the same time we had a US exchange student in the class, and she had a severe case of puppy fat, which is not very common in Danish girls, She looked like her skin vas stretched tightly by internal pressure. So on reading this unknown word "confederates" I read it as "cornfed ones", and kept believing that was it for several years before realizing my mistake. regards JakobA
  • alsation i use to call them al sasations
  • I say melk instead of milk, and 'ornch'juice instead of orange juice. I also have trouble saying 'rural' if I am sleepy, and 'musk oxen' eludes me entirely.
  • My sister had a major problem saying hamburger, she would say hamagerber. A girl friend of mine is incapable of saying Ketchup and Ambulance. She says Katchup and ambluance.
  • Remember = merember Remote = merote Sushi = shushi Miracle = cimircal they're the only four i can remember right now

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