ANSWERS: 13
  • First of all inviting 40 people for a baby turning 1 yr. old is way overboard. Second..if she wants that big of a party..dinner..then the mother in law should tell her that she will be glad to help but that the baby's mother needs to do the major part of the cooking..party..etc. It is very selfish for the daughter in law to take advantage of her mother in law...but the mother in law is at fault for allowing it to happen. :)
  • a bit but i have an idea, make it forty one and i`ll help out with the cooking
  • I don't agree with 'making' her mother in law do all the work; the mother is the one who decided to have the party for her son and invite all those people (esp. when the mother in law thought it would be fewer). She could ask her mother in law to help but not do everything. I think the number of people is subjective, and depends who's invited. I'd only invite people that are really 'in my life' as opposed to people I only see/talk to a few times a year, just to show off and get presents for the baby. For me, it would be more of an issue of how the party is handled (like how much it costs and how much they're going 'all out' with it). I'd rather have a lot of people with a simple party than fewer people and spending ridiculous amounts of money on a one year old; no offence to the child, but cmon he's ONE! He's not even aware of what a birthday is yet. Some parents go waaaaay overboard. And 99% of the time it's just to show off to say 'Look how much money I can shell out for my child'. Sorry if I went on and on lol but that's my view :)
  • I think it depends on when the mother-in-law agreed to do all of this cooking. Did the sister-in-law tell her there was going to be 40 people, and then she agreed, or did the sister-in-law just omit that information? If the mother-in-law was told about all 40 people and she agreed, then I guess she would have to do it because she said she would. If the sister-in-law just didn't tell her, then I think the sister-in-law should be doing all the cooking, because she is the one throwing the party for her child, not the mother-in-law. Either way, with 40 people, maybe it would be best for everyone to bring something, so it saves one person all the work of cooking it all. Sorry if this is confusing or anything.
  • Your sister-in-law is making a mistake. It is too many people. One she will pay for soon enough. A one year old, hopped up on sugar and overwhelmed by attention is a terrible thing. His embarrassing overwhelmed meltdown behavior will be her own reward.
  • The general rule is the number of guests should equal the child's age.
  • I think it is the Mother in law who is wrong. How can she be made to cook? I find your sister in law rude. I think it is up to whoever is doing the work to decide how many guest.
  • Sister-in-Law should have ASKED first! How rude! If mom-in-law was planning on cooking, she should have had a general idea before she was forced into a dinner for 40! Really, does a 1 year old have that many friends?
  • I think your sister-in-law is wrong in not telling the number of people she had invited for her son's birthday.Inviting 40 guests may not be wrong,but she should have arranged to get the dinner cooked by professional people.
  • The mother in law should have the party catered then charge it to the daughter in law.
  • The party isn't for the baby, is it? The party really is for the mom/dad...to celebrate having this gift. I hope they will all have a lovely day and mother-in-law gets help from some of the other guests. If she is doing it for free, that should be HER gift...and she should feel free to get as many helpers as she can from the extended family. Mom may not be a good cook, but she can do the shopping, the preparation, the serving and the cleaning up.....and as families 'pitch in', I hope everyone does just that to make this day as special as the parents obviously think it is.
  • Are those 40 people your sister-in-laws friends?
  • I find you wrong. It's not your problem

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