ANSWERS: 4
  • While they're in the same general class of insects, there are some differences: Crickets are mostly nocturnal (active at night) and grasshoppers are diurnal (active in the day). Because of this, crickets use their song to communicate in order to find females and warn off other males. Grasshoppers call in the day also but tend to be located high in the vegetation to see and be seen by other grasshoppers. Grasshoppers blend into the grass, but they also often have brightly colored under wings that they flash when they make short flights from place to place and also make noise when they do this. Crickets then to be dark to blend into the shadows or are pale green or brown to blend into the vegetation. The wings of a cricket are either absent or atrophied and they don't fly. Crickets have longer antennae than grasshoppers. The ears of a cricket are located in its legs and a grasshopper's are in its abdomen.
  • Yes there are,there a lot more grasshoppers than there are crickets. The difference is grasshoppers are small and will be seen on gardens fields and meadows. Crickets are bigger like the mole cricket and the great green bush cricket and they are seen on bushes and brambles.
  • As a general rule, the differences between grasshoppers, groundhoppers and crickets are: 1. the antennae of grasshoppers and groundhoppers are shorter than their bodies. 2. the collar (known as the pronotum) just behind the head of grasshoppers is short and saddle-shaped, but is much longer (in fact, as long or longer than the body) in groundhoppers. 3. the antennae of crickets are generally longer than their bodies (the exception is the mole-crickets) 3.Many grasshoppers and crickets are able to make a song that is specific to their species. Grasshoppers and groundhoppers make this sound by rubbing their legs and wings against each other. Crickets, bush-crickets and mole-crickets do it by rubbing their fore-wings together. Scientists call this 'singing' stridulating.
  • Same order (orthoptera), different families. Ditto for katydids.

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