ANSWERS: 69
  • Uhhmmm...c++, html, vbscript?
  • C++, JavaScript, VB. My next choice would be Python.
  • c++, html, java
  • BASIC ( I know :-) but its a good way to learn the structures ), C++ , and then probably Java, depending on what you want to write.
  • cobal, Basic, doss
  • C Assembly Java
  • C++, HTML and Javascript Those ARE all programming languages, right? *blush*
  • Three languages that every programmer should know is Perl, C++, and Visual Basic, because they are some of the simplest to learn and most useful when starting other good choices would be Ruby, Loa,and Java (if your desperate to learn a language)
  • HTML, C++ and Java were my first three, and they took me a long way.
  • C++ HTML SQL If you know C++ then you'll be able to master Java, C#, JavaScript or any other C-based language very easily. Also C++ could give you good Object-Oriented experience. C++ will also give you a good idea of memory management and I believe if you have some knowledge of this you'll be able to code better in any other language. HTML is absolutely vital today, and I think more and more applications will move towards web based applications. A lot of HTML can be generated for you these days, but I think some knowledge will still be to your benefit. You absolutely need some SQL knowledge. In most applications you'll be making use of a DB. If you can write efficient queries I think it will make your application much more efficient.
  • 1. Machine code/assembler - so you know what's going on at the "nitty gritty" level and what your processor actually does for a living. "Under the hood" programming. 2. VB/VBA - Great for driving office applications (Word, Excel, Access) and the easy way to talk to SQL/MySQL 3. Pascal/Delphi - so you can program regular code/OOPS in English rather than en explosion in a punctuation factory. 4. (I know you said 3) C and it's variants so that you can atleast understand and debug the stuff even if you never program in it.
  • asm, perl, c/c++
  • c++, html, BASIC
  • Learn ONE learn All If you really want to know then here it is READ Not Java, C++, PHP , C or or non-concurrent languages Why? search under: Concurrency-Revolution + Free-Lunch-is-Over and read some articles Search under wikipedia.og for Multiparadigm-programming-lang uages Search for "Multiparadigm-programmin g-languages" Get 8 paradigm language there is only 1 http://www.mozart-oz.org/ READ This if you can. If not forget the question Concepts-Techniques-and-Models -of-Computer-Programming pdf http://www.librecours.org/documents/5/521.pdf Preface To pdf Six blind sages were shown an elephant and met to discuss their ex-perience. “It’s wonderful,” said the first, “an elephant is like a rope: slender and flexible.” “No, no, not at all,” said the second, “an ele- phant is like a tree: sturdily planted on the ground.” “Marvelous,” said the third, “an elephant is like a wall.” “Incredible,” said the fourth, “an elephant is a tube filled with water.” “What a strange piecemeal beast this is,” said the fifth. “Strange indeed,” said the sixth, “but there must be some underlying harmony. Let us investigate the matter further.” – Freely adapted from a traditional Indian fable. “A programming language is like a natural, human language in that it favors certain metaphors, images, and ways of thinking.” – Mindstorms: Children, Computers, and Powerful Ideas [141], Seymour Papert (1980) One approach to study computer programming is to study programming languages. But there are a tremendously large number of languages, so large that it is impractical to study them all. How can we tackle this immensity? We could pick a small number of languages that are representative of different programming paradigms. But this gives little insight into programming as a unified discipline. This book uses another approach. We focus on programming concepts and the techniques to use them, not on programming languages. If you made it this far Read book and worked with oz-mozart then everything will be downwards not up Then do a search for - Concurrency-Revolution - High-Productivity-Computing-Sy stems HPC - Parallel-programming-multicore Do Not try to pick a specific language until reading Concepts-Techniques-and-Models -of-Computer-Programming and understanding a Multiparadigm-programming-lang uage with concurrency that can work in a multicore distributed enviroment such as oz-mozart If you do this you WILL BE ON THE RIGHT HIGHWAY and a great future will be ahead for you Jesus Be With You Always Think4Ever
  • If you understand and learn Basic, you will have the fundamentals of logic. If you learn C, it can be a great basic understanding for all of the C's and will apply to many OS's. Perl, would be my third choice as it applies to most OSs, and is very flexible. If you understand those three, and you've proven your abilities, you can get lazy and get into (and clean up) VB, C+, C++, C# (ug) html, and a few others.
  • Java, C, and Visual Basic ... the top three languages listed here: http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm
  • c++,java and VB.
  • The top three most popular programming languages according to the quarterly Tiobe.com survey, are Java, C and C++.
  • FIRST: Assembly language, any flavor, depending on your cpu and operating system. The three that I know that exist are: NASM, TASM, MASM. These languages are as close to the machine as you can get, unless you know direct machine language. After learning any or all of those (which are somewhat similar if you are using them on the same operating system for all of them,) you can start with any of the other languages. I am learning them in this way, currently: 1. Assembler (I am learning the three, TASM, NASM, and MASM for the x86 or IA-32 family.) About the IA-32 or x86 family: http://www.answers.com/topic/ia-32?cat=technology About assembly language for the IA-32 or x86 family: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_assembly_language At the previous link you can find more links to manuals that might be helpful to you if you intend to learn assembly language. 2. I am also learning C 3. I plan on learning C++ which is very similar to C 4. I plan to learn Java or C# whihc I have been told that are similar as well. Which ever is the path that you choose, consider that knowing assembly language will be a great benefit. I think that it makes it easier to debug some of your programs sometimes. Im not really sure, but I guess that most of the programming languages that exist today were built with other programmin languages which were eventually built with assembly language. Im not really sure of the history behind that though, so do not pay much attention to this last paragraph I wrote. Hopefully some one out there will clarify this for you, and me. Rock on!
  • C++, Java, Xhtml
  • There's a huge and common misconception with languages, that they're useful on their own, they're not, the libraries and API's that you work with using that language are what's useful, and most of these can be used with multiple languages so it really doesn't matter. C/C++, you need C because using C++ for anything small is like using a sledgehammer to break toffee.
  • I'm surprised by the number of people that think HTML is a programming language. It has no processing order, no decision making, no data manipulation. It's a markup language. All HTML documents contain are data, and indications of what context that data should be interpreted in. I'm a systems administrator, and I have to support many pieces of software written by people who use rapid development tools, who have no obvious understanding of how computers actually work, or of optimisation. The java programmers, for example, all scream for more powerful machines to make their programs run faster, without ever considering tiny changes to their code that would make things orders of magnitude faster. Seems that these environments don't force people to learn that. On the other hand, most languages that force you to learn about the platform don't enforce the kind of development methodology that makes for effective teams and development cycles. So we have different languages for different reasons. For understanding computers, and becoming a better programmer: I would choose 'C', for the realisations you make about program optimisation, how compilers work, memory management, and other elements that help you understand what more recently designed languages do for you. For object orientation, and structuring effective programs, I would choose Python. Not a language that forces object orientation onto everything, and one must learn when it is appropriate and when it is not - contrary to some opinions, OO is not a universal paradigm. No formal structure is. Python also teaches effective modern language shortcuts, such as list manipulation, and is capable of integration into rapid development structures. Lastly, Java. Because of the ease of setting up multithreaded and distributed applications.
  • i think java is better (platform independent),c#,ASP.net,php,SQL all these are easy to learn and if you have these you're the best and you can do any project you want to do ..
  • c++ , java , python or ruby
  • BASIC, to teach very basic thought processes. JAVA, to teach a modern and very useful language. HTML, self explanitory.
  • c and c++ must..........because these are the basic language and also use to develop window OS......With the help of the c ,c++ we can learn like languages java and .net
  • Like most computer questions, this is a "depends." For usability and flexibility: Perl, C++, Java For marketability: VB(.NET), Assembly, JS
  • Basic Cobol Perl
  • c,c++ and java are the three languages which one should know.
  • I think, that every programmer should know at most two languages. One procedural and one functional. These different concepts allows to look at the given problem from different view points, and to solve it the most effective way. Try to learn C++ and Scheme, for example. Or just learn python, which allow to mix both, procedural and functional styles.
  • How about three categories of languages: 1) A real programming language (C/C++/C#/Java/etc.) to do the heavy lifting. 2) A text manipulation language like Perl or even dos batch files, regular expressions, etc for helping you in your environment. 3) A scripting language like Lua, Ruby, Python, javascript, vbscript, etc.
  • php, javascript and c++
  • I would say Visual Basic, C language and Java.
  • I'm now in my third year of my degree in Computer Science. I personally think that one have to learn these three languages: C/C++, Java and PHP. =================================================== matt http://www.blogiseverything.com
  • prolog - such fun! assembly - such pain! C++ - such life!
  • C++, JavaScript, VB.
  • imho php, AS3/Flex, Java. chances are your always going to need java. i say php, because its easier to learn, its OOP (object oriented) and has the best online documentation system i have found. You will learn more about programming with php than if you learn c/c++ people just say that cause it sounds cool. C# maybe, but chances are your never going to use it, in most cases a java interpreter will do anything that your c code will and its multiplatform architecture allows you to write the code once, and release for multiple operating systems. to do this in c/c++/c# you basically run it through java anyways. I say Flex/AS3 because you will be able to write apps for Adobe AIR at the same time you make web content, and were talking about a really great language as well, xml based and pretty intuitive, you can guess at most of the function calls. which is really helpful, vs something like assembly which, is cool, but i never use it and i write software all day. I would like to toss a really cool language out there for you budding programmers. AutoHotkey is a very cool language, you can write really cool programs really fast, and make pretty complex programs in a few lines of code. i wrote a mouse gesture program to help me code, it does lookups on highlighted code with a gesture, or moves me between my 4D window space, generates sql queries ect.. very cool, and will get you on your way to making some cool apps you can use right away. This question is limited though, because its not the right one, its not three, its just which ones. your going to have to learn sql as well, any decent developer can write even a basic query and your going to be using databases pretty much no matter what if your going to work on any good sized program. using externalized datasources is always a good idea for large apps because you dont have to worry about writing storage into your code. These other answers or the few i read at the top anyways, were a bit on the newbie side, you dont ever want to start off with the hardest language, you'll end up hating programming and never get any further, try autohotkey or learn php, they are fast to learn, php is a fully OOP language now at version 5 so you have a powerful system to work with, and you can start writing apps your first day. Stick with the easy stuff till you get comfortable with programming and can write simple things like loops, switches, if statements, nested structures and the like without a reference, then go for some harder stuff just to flex the brain, such as Flex ;) which gets you paid and its fun. -=Levi=-
  • Java, Javascript, and Perl.
  • C, C++.............
  • Basic, C, and assembly
  • I think as today's world is going online in every field learning languages support the online applications will be benificial. I am working in porgramming since last 2 and half years and have command over vb 6.0 vb.Net Asp.Net (Framework) Then I go for C# And Now i want to learn PHP as learning never ends
  • Java VB Scheme
  • Java, VB, And C++.
  • C,C++, JavaScript............
  • c,c++,Html
  • Java XML(including XSLT/XQuery) PHP or Flex
  • Definitely C,C++(ANSI Standards),COBOL,SQL,HTML. All these will fullfill the standard requirements. Dillip Rout, Bhubaneswar, India
  • Every scripting language is unique. Depends on what the coder wants get out of it? If its application development, or web design, or others. There is many different aspects of programming. I Code in... Delphi for Application development PHP for Web-design MySQL for Database management. And recently took up some JavaScript Courses for enhancing web-page contents. Btw Java is a dying language.
  • This really depends on what your target is. Desktop, web or embedded designs. For Desktop I like using VS2008 and C# (.net 2.0), C++ (MFC) For Web c#, javascript, HTML, actionscript 3 embedded : ASM, small C, and recently c# with micro framework 2.0 Don't forget about becoming proficient in SQL
  • C++ JAVA Assembly language
  • only three? okay, here's my picks: c - imperative language. manual memory management. incredibly pervasive. python - object oriented, dynamically typed. haskell - purely functional, lazy evaluation. you learn those three, you learn most of the concepts that other languages will mix and match with.
  • javascript - the darkhorse of programming languages that somehow convinced everyone for years that it was a 'toy'. I think javascript's importance will only increase - and it may even find favour in some areas outside of the traditional web GUI domain. tcl - if you recognize that your own time is the precious resource - and you need a solid glue to get complex systems working together. (also because it crops up in various built-in scripting engines in applications - as well as for example, the configuration language for cisco routers) ...and just enough perl to repair it or beat it into shape without going mad. (php is great - but it doesn't make my list because anyone who's already a programmer can make it work 'well enough' - even if they don't know enough to make it sing ) More 'low-level' languages better suited to 'systems' programming (e.g c/c++) didn't make my list - but it doesn't mean I think they're not important. It's just that I suspect the trend is towards the great majority of programmers working further away from the metal. The idea that you need to have burned your fingers with pointers or memory allocation issues to understand efficiency at a high level doesn't seem persuasive to me. Shame I couldn't put Erlang in my list.. it's a beautiful language(and platform).. but even though my list is obviously already coloured by personal preference, I couldn't really say *every* programmer should know it.
  • I'd go for C (high level but allows you to hit the hardware if you wish), PHPPerl, and Occam... joking about the last one! Once you've got C under your belt all other languages will be a walkover, you're next best bet would be to get to grips with OOD and OOP. And then onto SIMD programming, for, as far I can see, the next paradigm shift is going to be towards the Data first, Instruction second. Have a look at CELL programming on the PS3.
  • php/asp/asp.net *html is not a programming language. it's a markup language.
  • Really depends on what is the target of the developer. There is no "universal" language that everyone should know. I can't code HTML or any web languages to save my life. I know C, C++, Assembly, Java and ML really well.
  • i think c, java , vb........
  • At the moment i would say java, its developing like mad!
  • ....PYTHON
  • assembly, java & plankalkul lol...
  • It depends on the platform for which you're developing. I think it's more important that you study and learn the constructs and principles of software development. Knowing that, you can easily learn the syntax of a particular language and then apply your knowledge of software development to the specific language. If you're looking for a good programming language to start with, I really like Delphi as a learning language.
  • Java, PHP, HTML
  • php, jquery, perl
  • 1. Basic (Visual Basic) - 'cause it always best to start with the basics. 2. C++ (C, Cplus included) - 'cause this is the basis of most new "high level" languages out there. 3. Assembly - 'cause you don't know squat if you don't know what your µP is doing with those 1s and 0s. Hope this helps.
  • Visual Basic (because it's basic), Java (because it's very common), and C++ (because it's high standerd).
  • C, C++ and Perl
  • I think he must know C++,Assembly,Java
  • C - A good balance between high-level and low-level Assembly - Because it's important to know what's going on at a lower level. HTML - For websites and help files. Actually, it has a lot of uses. Not really a need in most cases, but still. I'd also suggest Brainfuck to anybody who likes a challenge.
  • C,C++,HTML,JAVA..

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