ANSWERS: 100
  • "The Sight" by David Clement-Davies, and if you like it you should read "Fell" by David Clement-Davies.
  • "CIA: Mission to Burundi" by John M Bernier. Takes a bit to get into but it was fun. "Catch 22" by Joseph Heller. Yes, they're both old books. I usually prefer non-fiction. "The Dilbert Principle" by Scott Adams is fun, as is most of the sequels. "Liar's Poker" by Michael Lewis is quite amazing. "Confessions of an Economic Hit Man" by John Perkins.
  • hehe.. hehe... the halo books
  • Anything by Ira Levin who just died recently. This Perfect Day Rosemary's Baby and the sequel Son of Rosemary Sliver The Boys From Brazil A Kiss Before Dying The Stepford Wives
  • ... here is a great series that has been on the best sellers list many times ... from the first one that creates the main characters to the most recent ... these guys have been publishing another book in the series every few months for many many years ...
  • Lord of the Rings
  • Ahab's Wife by Sena Jeter Naslund. It's Moby Dick from the wife's point of view. Incredibly well written! Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. Amazing book in so many ways...and it won the Pulitzer!
  • "The Street lawyer" by John Grishom or anything by him.
  • i LOVED white oleander. ive read it atleast six times, without even skipping parts. its just an awesome book. that and here be dragons by sharon kay penman.
  • If you like apocryphal stuff, Swan Song by Robert McCammon is great. A young girl leads a band of rag-tag survivors in a battle against evil. Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice. A different take on vampires; very sensual. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold. The story of a family torn apart by the murder of one of its members, told by the deceased girl. Newer fiction: Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen. A vet student runs away from the circus and experiences perilous adventures. I'm almost finsihed with The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak. Told by Death, the story of a young girl with a thirst for knowledge and a penchant for trouble in Nazi Germany. I can't say how it ends but so far it's a great read. Lastly, it's not fiction but Adrift by Steven Callahan is the true story of his 76 days lost at sea. Compelling and simply written.
  • Michael Crichton's books. Congo, Jurassic Park, etc. They are quick reading, make you think.
  • I like books that are a little effed up. Chuck Palahniuk (author of Fight Club) writes pretty damn good books. I think you'd like him. He's one of my favs. Scar Tissue (Biography of Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chilli Peppers) is really good to, whether or not you like RHCP. A Million Little Pieces/My friend Leonard - James Frey --> Both really good books, supposed to be a true story, but the author got caught making most of it up. Good books nonetheless. Augusten Borroughs (Running with scissors, Dry) Those are pretty good too. IF you don't like reading about drugs addictions, sex, and CRAZY sh*t, disregard this list.
  • All Harry potter books by J.K. Rowling The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown Deception Point by Dan Brown Angels and Demons by Dan Brown Digital Fortress by Dan Brown
  • My favorite - and it´s the greatest book ever - John Fowles - The Magnus. Great (and not so known)
  • Life of Pi by Yann Martel. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. These are my two favourite books
  • "What Harry Saw" (Thomas Moran) and "Summer Sisters" (Judy Blume) are tied for my absolute favourite, Followed by "A Dirty Job" (Christopher Moore). Two other good ones are "Forrest Gump" (it's a lot different than the movie) and "Gump & Co.", both by Winston Groom.
  • If you haven't yet, everybody should read The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy. I have read it literally 20 times, at least. Every time I run across it, I stop what I'm doing, sit down, and read it (very bad for productivity, expecially around housecleaning time). I love Stephen King, and my favorites of his are The Stand and Needful Things. Also, Our Man in Havana is really good. And The Series of Unfortunate Events books. They're twistedly hilarious.
  • The Hobbit by JRR Tolkien - get the background to The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. Another book I love is The Plague Dogs by Richard Adams.
  • Lots. First, The Golden Compass and series. It's really good. It's hard to explain without giving everything away, but it's a really good book. There are two more in that series, but that's the best one. Also, Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse. I just started New Moon, but my friend has read them all and says they're some of her favorite books. And she reads a lot. Depending on how old you are, Thirteen Reasons Why. It's really good. It just came out, and it's about a boy who gets a shoebox in the mail. There's no return adress, and when he opens it, there are 7 cassette tapes. They contain the last words of a girl who, 2 weeks before, committed suicide. He follows her around town as she describes 13 people, 13 reasons why she killed herself. It's really good, but it's kind of.. erm, mature. Not really bad, but not good for like 5th graders.
  • Just looking over at my shelves here and picking out a few random examples of stuff I enjoyed: Franz Kafka - Metamorphosis and Other Stories (includes famous story about man who wakes up having turned into a beetle and faces subsequent rejection by his family.) Joanne Harris - Chocolat (the book is much better than the film. Very sensual and sexy and fun.) Isabelle Allende - Eva Luna (great South American writer - this is the best of hers I've read) Jostein Gaarder - Sophie's World (Brilliantly presented mystery story mixed in with a history of philosophy - genius.) John Fowles - The Collector (book about a kidnapping, underated novel by author mainly famous for other books.) Donna Tarrt - The Secret History (I rave about this book all the time - just read it OK?)
  • I absolutely adored The Catcher in the Rye.
  • I love Fire Bringer by David Clement-Davis. Its a fantasy book, but don't be put off by the personification of the deer. Its actually very good
  • "Even Cowgirls Get The Blues" by Tom Robbins. Very well written, a lot of metaphors, and many direct life lessons, and indirect ones if you can interpret them.
  • I just read "My Sister's Keeper" by Jodi Picoult. IT WAS OUTSTANDING. Really good, you should read it. It's about a family who finds out their daughter has luekemia and needs stem cells. So they genetically select an embryo that will be a match for their daughter, and have this next child just to be a donor for the sick one. The girl grows up giving all kinds of things to her sister, bone marrow, etc. And now the family wants her to give her sister a kidney. The girl files for medical emancipation from her family. It's fascinating and the end is superb. Also good by Jodi Picoult is "Nineteen Minutes" about a school shooting and what happens afterwards, and what happened before that caused it to happen. REALLY GOOD. And one of my all time favorite books - "Searching for God Knows What" by Donald Miller.
  • Augusten Burroughs has some good ones. Running With Scissors for one.
  • Any 'Discworld' novel by Terry Pratchett you can find. They are hysterically funny and extremely clever. My favourite character is Death. He's got the scythe and the cape and the skeletal thing happening, rides a huge white horse called Binky and loves cats. In the novel "Mort" he gets sick of being Death and takes on an apprentice...
  • Weaveworld by Clive Barker - it's a weird sort of mixture of fantasy and horror, 'an epic adventure of the imagination'... It's very complex, takes a bit of concentration... you want something to keep you occupied for a week or two, this is it. Brilliant.
  • Any translation of 'Njal's Saga'. It's Snorri Sturlusson's Icelandic Classic. Several publishers. I know it's out in Penguin. (Ah...you say, Isn't it marvelous what's been printed in bird-language!...)
  • I really loved the "Incarnations of Immortality" series by Piers Anthony. The series is about people becoming incarnations of certain things: death, time, fate, war, nature, etc. Really interesting and creative books. 1-"On a Pale Horse" 2-"Bearing an Hourglass" 3-"With a Tangled Skein" 4-"Wielding a Red Sword" 5-"Being a Green Mother" 6-"For Love of Evil" 7-"And Eternity"
  • The Time Traveler's Wife A Thousand Splendid Suns The Kitchen Boy Anything by Anne Tyler.
  • ANGELS&DEMONS by Dan Brown I can't even begin to describe how truly captivating I found that book to be. The sequel THE DAVINCI CODE gained considerably more fame, but I myself while liking both much enjoyed the first far more. I will post my <?> about this very subject below, please check it out.
  • The one I always recommend: ENDER'S GAME, by Orson Scott Card. I can't begin to tell you how good it is and what a surprise it is. I have never met anyone who didn't love it. It seems to effect everyone about the same, no matter what their reading preferences are. (it is sci-fi)
  • &quot;The Labyrinth" by Kate Mosse.......fantastic book "Thirteen Moons" by Charles Frazier anything by Gregory Maguire-"Wicked", "Son of a Witch", "Mirror, Mirror" "Map of Bones" by James Rollins I could go on and on and on. Books are my crack.=)
  • A Piece of Cake by Cupcake Brown.
  • Ringworld by Larry Niven, anything by Richard Bach or Edward Abbey, Swan Song by Robert McCammon, Robert Ludlam if you like spy novels (he wrote the Bourne series), Jack Tales by Richard Chase . . . depends on the type of fiction you like. If you don't already have a huge list from the helpful folks on AB; I'm a librarian and would be glad to help you look for something more specific. If so just leave a comment.
  • Hotel Babylon by ImogenEdwards-Jones & Anonymous.
  • Two books well worth reading are both these books below. They will tells the world readers pretty excellent stories and happening about these two artists, one bankrupt and the other penny-less his whole life, and are considered to be fiction by MFA experts. The good thing is that you can make up your own minds after reading them. I believe the MFA experts just skimmed through them. The Life and Times of Rembrandt Van Rijn By; Hendrik Van Loon. Vincent Van Gogh By; Meier-Graefe
  • The Bible. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
  • 1) A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry (AMAZING, but incredibly depressing I seriously kid you not.... about both) 2) Lolita - Nabokov (Scandalous, but very interesting, but pretty DAMN scandalous, the concept at least) 3) The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini (Really excruciating to read at times, but completely worth while) 4) Zorba The Greek - Kazantzakis (A little slow at times, and a decently long book, but VERY interesting philosophies on lifestyles, existence of God, and the nature of humans; it's hard to explain. Also set in Greece, so there is beautiful imagery and interesting cultural references) I hope you enjoy those books if you ever have a chance to pick them up!
  • To Kill a Mockingbird
  • Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld. I've never read a more truthful and brave book.
  • what about paulo cohelo books?
  • Although there are some terribly good books already suggested, many of which I love dearly, I think everyone should read: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Keasey A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and Fish a fairly short story whose author escapes me. I'm a huge Marx Bros fan, but trust me when I suggest Groucho and Me (by Groucho Marx) or Harpo Speaks! (Harpo Marx with Roland Barber).
  • The Bright Forever by Lee Martin. I picked it up at target one day while my 3 year old was in the hospital. I was sick of watching "CARS" over and over again so I just grabbed something to give me something to do! Best darn book I ever read. Quick read. only about 280?? pages. I couldnt put it down and was done the next day!
  • the scarlett pimpernell series by baroness orzey any Sherlock Holmes by conan Doyle alms for oblivion series (14 books) simon Raven in the garden of good and evil any fredrich forsyth (day of the jackal) Olivia goldsmith first wives club this should keep you busy for a while:))
  • Easy any Dan Brown books.
  • My Sister's Keeper~Picoult, Stones From The River~Hegi
  • If you haven't read Atonement I highly suggest you do. It is very good! Also, The Notebook or any books by Nikolas Sparks. I think he is a great author. I don't know if you're into fantasy, but The Hobbit and LOTR are also good choices if your up for a challenge.
  • Nonfiction - "Guns, Germs, and Steel" by Jared Diamond Fiction - "Wicked" by Gregory Maguire
  • Gone with the Wind, Margaret Mitchell If if like that one, then read Scarlett (not by Margaret Mitchell...) The Five people you meet in Heaven, by Mitch Albom anything by David Sedaris cracks me up
  • Currently, I would recommend any of the following: * The Ruins by Scott Smith * Duma Key by Steven King * A Necessary Evil by Robert Stricklin * No Country For Old Men by Cormac McCarthy All are very good.
  • i would recommend the bible....just joking i relly enjoyed the series of book called sabriel lirael and abhorsen all by the author garth nix there fiction and are based on magic and necromance only the necromance part is that there trying to rid of in not rais bodies, seriously these were kick ___ books!
  • Breakfast Of Champions. By Kurt Vonnegut JR. It made me rethink just about everything that I thought I knew to be true.
  • yes, A Child Called It, & So. Be. It, and i think people who enjoy reading should... but thiose 2 book s are VERY GOOD
  • I read the "secret" and now I am reading a new earth by eckhart tolle...good
  • the ammytiville horror, or however its spelt. the movie was crap but its the only book iv ever read that i really got into and couldnt wait to read what happened next. prolly wouldnt be so great if you had seen the movie before reading it.
  • the Lord of the RIngs series. Much better that the movies.
  • Dan Brown - Digital Fortress.. a mind blowing, faced paced, story of hackers bringing down a secret email cracking supercomputer owned by the US government.. it's much better than I have made it sound, its not all nerdy!
  • Love the way you wrote the question. LOL ... sorry I can't help with fiction since you already read the bible :)
  • Faith of the Fallen, by Terry Goodkind. It is my all time favorite book, and my Bible. Its the sixth in the series (Sword of Truth) but for the most part (because each of the are between six and nine hundred pages long) you only need minimal background knowledge to read it, because it stands alone. If you do pursue the whole series, don't let the fifth one stop you, its just a bump in the road, the Faith of the Fallen totally redeems it.
  • Also, Fahrenheit 451, because it should be read by everyone, especiaqlly because, out of the political satires that I've read, this one is closest too our society, and getting closer every day.
  • I reccomend all the "James Herriot" books. He's the author and the books are about his life as a vet. You'll be laughing reading one chapter and possibly crying reading another chapter. Trust me, you won't regret reading his books. Some Titels are:------- "It shouldn't happen to a vet" and "Let sleeping vets lie" and there are more.
  • &quot;On the Night of the Seventh Moon" by Victoria Holt but any of her books will do. She keeps you absolutly capitvated and its like going back in time. If you want a more recent author, try Jillian Hunt(er?)...I loved "The Devilish Pleasures of a Duke" *sigh*
  • I love the Stephanie Plum novels by Janet Evanovich. Dean Koontz as well...specifically: False Memory, Intensity, The Husband, The Odd Thomas trilogy, The Frankenstein books and Darkfall. Some good Stephen King as well: The Stand, Geralds Game, Misery, Cell, Four Past Midnight, The Shining. I also think everyone should read 1984 by George Orwell if you already haven't!! Oh and the Harry Potter books are entertaining as well :)
  • Snowflower and the Secret Fan....Lisa See
  • Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult. It's about a school shooting in a small town and all of the people involved. It's an excellent book.
  • The best book I've read in years is: The Time Traveler's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. Truly, I laughed and cried. There had been rumblings about this being made into a movie starring Eric Bana & Rachael McAdams; I sure hope that happens! Here's the basic synopsis: Henry has a mysterious condition: he is able to travel through time. On one such trip, he meets Clare, visiting her at various times in her life until, finally, the two meet in real time, marry, and have a child--who is also a time-traveler. Henry dies, tragically, at 43--but returns to Clare when she herself is in extreme old age.
  • Since it's not the most recent publication mentioned in this thread you might have already read "Of Mice and Men". The edition I had was 192 pages. I took it to bed thinking that it put me to sleep. It was such an involving and compellingly tragic story that I read in it in 2 1/2 hours.
  • The Demonata series, by Darren Shan. Once you've read the first one, Lord Loss, you'll be hooked! The Noughts and Crosses trilogy is also excellent - along with 'The Stuff of Nightmares' also by Malorie Blackman. That scared me stiff.
  • Beach Girls by Luanne Rice is terrific. Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody is a pretty long book, but I couldn't put it down. You should also consider reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon), Jacob Have I Loved (Katherine Paterson), and Follow the River (James Alexander Thom).
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Sun Tzu's "Art of War".
  • Velvet Elvis by Rob Bell
  • Noughts and Crosses, by Malorie Blackman. Very hard-hitting.
  • Dune by Frank Herbert
  • The Saga of the Pony Express should be required for all Freshman high school students. Would put a touch of perspective on how easy they all really have it. ALL OF THEM!!!!
  • The Wealthy Barber
  • Stranger In A Strange Land - Robert A. Heinlein
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • I know this much is true, or "she's come undone" both by wally lamb
  • Bombay Time: A Novel by Thrity Umrigar The Boleyn Inheritance by Philippa Gregory A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
  • A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, Our Vines Have Tender Grapes, Grapes of Wrath, Goodbye Mr Chips
  • Have you tried James Michener? He writes wonderful, long historical fiction novels. All of them are excellent, but my personal favorites are Hawaii, Centennial & Texas.
  • Maru by Bessie Head To kill a mocking bird by Harper Lee
  • Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams Any of the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett All entertaining and witty!
  • Catcher In The Rye, i love anything by J.D.Salinger but thats probably the easiest. 'Raise High The Roof Beam Carpenters and Seymour:An Introduction' by him is my favourite.
  • The best book I read last year was "Mockingbird" by Walter Tevis. It's a SF novel about a distopian (opposite of utopia)future but worth reading because it is thought provoking.
  • The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver or anything by John Irving
  • anything by chuck klosterman or jack kerouac. the celestine prophecy series by james redfield is great. fragile things by neil gaiman. this is your brain on music: the science of a human obsession by daniel j. levitin. that's all i've got for now
  • &quot;The Memory Keeper's Daughter" by Kim Edwards. This stunning novel begins on a winter night in 1964, when a blizzard forces Dr. David Henry to deliver his own twins. His son, born first, is perfectly healthy, but the doctor immediately recognizes that his daughter has Down syndrome. For motives he tells himself are good, he makes a split-second decision that will haunt all their lives forever. He asks his nurse, Caroline, to take the baby away to an institution. Instead, she disappears into another city to raise the child as her own. Compulsively readable and deeply moving, The Memory Keeper's Daughter is a brilliantly crafted story of parallel lives, familial secrets, and the redemptive power of love.
  • Haunted. im not sure who wrote it cuz i gave it to my boyfriend to read it
  • Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman -
  • The Twilight Saga, by Stephanie Meyer, is a great line of books to read--it consists of Twilight, New Moon, and Eclipse, and the soon-to-be released Breaking Dawn. Also, Max Brooks has two really great zombie books--The Zombie Survival Guide, and World War Z. Great and highly entertaining books. But there are really so many great books out there, it'd be difficult to recommend just one--or even just one series; there's the Inheritance Trilogy, by Christopher Paolini, and, if you don't mind "kid" books, the Series Of Unfortunate Events. I read the Pendragon series quite a while ago, and can't remember the author, but those were quite good too. And of course, there's always the classics--The Lord of the Flies, Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Expectations--the list goes on and on...
  • my fave book ive read recently is The Kite Runner - havnt met anyone who didnt love it!
  • Hm, the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jorden was a awesome series. Unfortentally, its unfinished. Robert Jorden Died before finishing the last book, sadly.
  • I read Gone With the Wind and it really was a great book to read. Also Saavedra's Don Quixote de la Mancha is a great book to read. (It has part I and part II)
  • &quot;Narcissus and Goldmund is a novel written by the German Swiss author Hermann Hesse and was first published in German as Narziß und Goldmund, in 1930. At its publication, Narcissus and Goldmund was considered Hesse's literary triumph; bibliographically, it follows Der Steppenwolf." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narcissus_and_Goldmund
  • i recently read Lullabies for Little Criminals by Heather O'Neill .. it was really good. i cried, i laughed, i was amazed .. but it's a tad controversial so if you like good clean fun i don't recommend it
  • Not fiction, but please read A Million Little Pieces by James Frey; such a GOOD BOOK!
  • Old question and I may have already answered, but my pick would be "The Mists of Avalon" by Marion Zimmer Bradley. It is a classic retelling of the legend of King Arthur but from a woman-of-power's perspective. Extremely well-written, richly developed characters and still my favorite book of all time.

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