ANSWERS: 2
  • The pig?
  • Bacon is defined as any of certain cuts of meat taken from the sides, belly or back of a pig that may be cured and/or smoked. Meat from other animals may also be cured or otherwise prepared to resemble bacon, such as chicken or turkey bacon. In continental Europe, it is used primarily in cubes (lardons), as a cooking ingredient valued both as a source of fat and for its flavour. In Italy, besides being used in cooking, bacon (pancetta) is also served uncooked and thinly sliced as part of an antipasto. Bacon is also used for barding and larding roasts, especially game birds. Many people prefer to have their bacon smoked by using various types of woods. This process can take up to 10 hours depending on the intensity of the flavor desired. Bacon may be eaten fried, baked, or grilled. It is commonly used in sandwiches. A side of unsliced bacon is a flitch or slab bacon, while an individual slice of bacon is a rasher (UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand) or simply a slice or strip (North America). Slices of bacon are also known as collops. Traditionally, the skin is left on the cut and is known as bacon rind. Rindless bacon, however, is quite common. In the United Kingdom and Ireland, bacon comes in a wide variety of cuts and flavours whereas bacon in America is predominantly what is known as "streaky bacon", or "streaky rashers" in the UK and Ireland. Bacon made from the meat on the back of the pig is referred to as back bacon and is part of traditional British and Irish breakfasts. In the US, back bacon may also be referred to as Canadian-style Bacon or Canadian Bacon.[1] The USDA defines bacon as "the cured belly of a swine carcass," while other cuts and charactistics must be separately qualified (e.g. "smoked pork loin bacon").[2] "USDA Certified" bacon means that it has been treated for trichinella. To sum it up...Not the Jews.

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