ANSWERS: 7
  • The calm before the storm isn't a new concept by any means. It was recognized long ago that before a severe storm, the air is still and the birds stop singing and go to shelter. "Calm continueth not long without a storm." This quote from an unknown source was written in 1576. Edit: Thanks lettuce9! http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/scienceques2003/20030926.htm
  • More accurately the barometric pressure rapidly changes and most animals are way more sensitive to the oncoming of a storm so they burrow in and go quiet. It has also been linked to idiots who venture out into the eye of a hurricane thinking it is over.
  • Yes, there is such a phenomenon. The calm tends to be most noticeable in what is called a 'worst-first' storm: a storm where the most severe weather occurs at the leading edge of the storm. A 'worst-last' storm slowly builds to a climax. The apparent calm is caused by the direction of air circulation at the leading edge of the storm. There is often a strong vertical updraft, which to a person standing on the ground, appears to be a calm. The air is actually rushing upwards, feeding the storm front. Reply: Yes one would, but people peddling infotainment will choose the blown-away-house and the crying-in-the-street stories every time. If it bleeds, it leads. Don't enlighten and educate people - that's boring.
  • Here is an interesting site to read:http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/scienceques2003/20030926.htm Relevant quotes: The calm before the storm isn't a new concept by any means. It was recognized long ago that before a severe storm, the air is still and the birds stop singing and go to shelter. "Calm continueth not long without a storm." This quote from an unknown source was written in 1576. 2.It should be noted that in many cases, the perception that it seems calm is not actually true. We're perhaps so accustomed to hearing this maxim (calm before the storm) that when threatening weather is on our doorstep, we think that there will be a "mandatory" lull before the big blow. Storms connote suddenness -- meaning that weather conditions are drastically different before, during and after the storm. Most of us have experienced an eery silence before a storm strikes. Sometimes you'll hear the comment that "It came out of nowhere, and there wasn't a breath of air before all hell broke loose." On the other hand, with frontal storms, the weather may be tumultuous well before a line of thunderstorm approaches. Southwest winds ahead of an advancing cold front, for example, can be rather vigorous, even hours before cumulonimbus clouds begin to build.
  • I wondered that a few hours ago the weather was really strange looking and then it got real still and then the winds started whirling like mad the rains poured and now it's still again -
  • Relatively speaking I would say yes, since the storm is always more violent and dramatic than the time preceding it.
  • No. first the wind, then the rain, then the storm.

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