ANSWERS: 11
  • The brasilian of portuguese origin, language or tradition would not be hispanic, but lusitanic: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lusitanic
  • Depends on who's hiring ;)
  • brasilians and portuguese consider themselves latin but not latino. just that brasilians are latin americans while portuguese are latin europenas ... ... now a colombian or a peruvian might consider themselves latino but thats because thats the term they use ... they are latin american (latino american between themselves) and definetly hispanic. the thing is that latin is a very contraversial term ... so instead of offending people and using a word that can mean various things to a different variety people ... we simply call spanish speakers hispanics. i am brazilian and somehow alot of people always ask me this question , in wikipedia they say the following LATINO ............... "The term Latino was officially adopted in 1997 by the United States Government in the ethnonym Hispanic or Latino, which replaced the single term "Hispanic".[5] U.S. official use of the term Hispanic has its origins in the 1970 census. The Census Bureau attempted to identify all Hispanics by use of the following criteria in sampled sets:[6] Spanish speakers and persons belonging to a household where Spanish was spoken Persons with Spanish heritage by birth location Persons who self-identify with Spanish ancestry or descent Authorities of American English maintain a distinction between the terms Hispanic and Latino: "Though often used interchangeably in American English, Hispanic and Latino are not identical terms, and in certain contexts the choice between them can be significant. Hispanic, from the Latin word for "Spain, " has the broader reference, potentially encompassing all Spanish-speaking peoples in both hemispheres and emphasizing the common denominator of language among communities that sometimes have little else in common. Latino—which in Spanish means "Latin" but which as an English word is probably a shortening of the Spanish word latinoamericano—refers more exclusively to persons or communities of Latin American origin. Of the two, only Hispanic can be used in referring to Spain and its history and culture; a native of Spain residing in the United States is a Hispanic, not a Latino, and one cannot substitute Latino in the phrase the Hispanic influence on native Mexican cultures without garbling the meaning. In practice, however, this distinction is of little significance when referring to residents of the United States, most of whom are of Latin American origin and can theoretically be called by either word."[7] Neither term refers to a race, as a person of Latino or Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race.[8][4] Note that Latino as officially defined in the United States includes neither Brazilian Americans nor Haitian Americans, although Brazil is a Latin American country, and Haiti is often considered one as well. However, neither country is of "Spanish culture or origin", as stipulated in the definition.[4] SOOOOOO [[ VERY IMPORTANT]] -Spain can be hispanic and latin but not latino. -Any country in the Americas that speaks spanish is Hispanic or Latin (or refer to themselves as latino) -Brasil and Portugal can be latin but not latino and defenitly not hispanic LATIN ................. The expansion of the Roman Empire spread Latin throughout Europe, and, eventually, Vulgar Latin began to dialectize, based on the location of its various speakers. Vulgar Latin gradually evolved into a number of distinct Romance languages, a process well underway by the 9th century. These were for many centuries only oral languages, Latin still being used for writing. For example, Latin was still the official language of Portugal in 1296, after which it was replaced by Portuguese. Many of these "daughter" languages, including Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, and Romansh, flourished, the differences between them growing greater and more formal over time."
  • How can you determine the ethnicity of so diverse a nation? That's like saying that all Americans are white.
  • Brazilians speaks Portuguese and is neither white or Hispanic origin. Why? Some background info: Brazilians are mostly descendants of colonial and post-colonial Portuguese settlers and immigrants, African slaves and Brazil's indigenous peoples, along with several other groups of immigrants who arrived in Brazil mostly from the 1820s until the 1970s. Most of the immigrants were Italians and Portuguese, but also significant numbers of Germans, Spaniards, Japanese, and Lebanese. The skin color differs on Brazilians. They are not considered White (although some people's skin color is) or Hispanic http://www.wikipedia.org
  • Well thats a complex question because Brazil is complex. A 100 % stock european Portuguese person is 100% white pure and simple. That said were not talking about a european were talking about about folks from Brazil and the fact is its so mixed so its not a black and white issue really ya know. An example is just because a black person in america has an english name of Jackson does that mean he is 100% stock english ? well no. Personally i think its as simple as looking at the person from Brazil and if you see european blood and features and a long face they are white.
  • Why do they need any label other than Brazilian?
  • There are three types of Brazilians: - White Brazilians - Black Brazilians - Black Lucitanic Brazilians The black Lucitanic Brazilians look like Hugo Chavez from Venezuela.
  • I was born in Brazil, I have been in the States for most of my life, my grandmother was Lebanese and my grandfather was Portuguese on my mother’s side. My father’s grandfather was Italian. I AM BRAZILIAN! Not Hispanic, Not Latino. I do not have anything against any ethnicity category, but If you are born in the US and your grandparents were from Puerto Rico , what would you consider yourself? Hispanic, correct? So Brazilians should look at their background, if you are a Brazilian but you are of Japanese descends you are Asian. BTW… Did you know that there are more people of Japanese descent in Brazil than anywhere in the world outside of Japan itself. 1.5 Million and growing
  • I was born in Brazil, I have been in the States for most of my life, my grandmother was Lebanese and my grandfather was Portuguese on my mother’s side. My father’s grandfather was Italian. I AM BRAZILIAN! Not Hispanic, Not Latino. I do not have anything against any ethnicity category, but If you are born in the US and your grandparents were from Puerto Rico , what would you consider yourself? Hispanic, correct? So Brazilians should look at their background, if you are a Brazilian but you are of Japanese descends you are Asian. BTW… Did you know that there are more people of Japanese descent in Brazil than anywhere in the world outside of Japan itself. 1.5 Million and growing
  • Brazilians have a wide spectrum of color. One brazilian from Santa Catarina state can walk in a german street without backsights; one woman from São Paulo could be placed in central Africa e pass like a Congo national. And vice-versa! In genetics, a study found that, in average, brazilians have 70% of european blood, 20% african and around 8% native american blood, but this numbers don't tell the amazing history of the brazilian melting pot. By the last census, 49% consider themselves white, 44% pardo (mulatto, mestizo)and 7% black. "Hispanic" refers to people with a genetic or cultural heritage from Spain; in Brazil, around 10% of the population have hispanic heritage, but I doubt that that people considers themselves "hispanic". Brazilians tend to offend about that kind of comparison, because they don't like to be misplaced with other latin american citizens. I bet that, by the american "white standard", around 15 to 20% of the brazilians would be called white.

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