ANSWERS: 35
  • The cheapest I remember gas and when I started paying attention, was about 90 cents. When I actually started driving it was about $1.10.
  • I usually don't remember such details, but I was driving taxicabs for a living then. Gas: $.99 a gallon
  • I think it was about 32 cents and that was for good gas which my parents cars needed. When we went on our honeymoon we ended up at this out of the way gas station and they wanted 55 cents for their gas. We went home and complained about that for months. How dare they charge so much!!! lol!!!
  • 95.9 cents per gallon of gas, or thereabouts. Those days are long gone though...just how it is.
  • When I started driving, around 1976, I remember paying fifty cents a gallon. It was either leaded or unleaded, fifty or fifty five cents a gallon. When I was a kid in the early sixties I remember a loaf of bread, wrapped in paper (plastic bags came years later), with a .25 cents stamp on the end of the loaf. It was Holsum brand. They had a monopoly here in Puerto Rico for that kind of bread.
  • I'm 22 years old... I remember it being .89... That's the cheapest I can remember...
  • I remember bread being 25 cents. and gas being 17 and 18 cents when i was a kid. the gas stations would have price wars with each other.
  • gas about 50 cents a large loaf of wonder bread about 69 cents
  • Gas was 24 cents per gallon when I started driving. A loaf of bread was around 50 cents I think.
  • $1.29 I can remeber when there was only home baked bread
  • Gas was 10 cents,bread was 5cents a loaf and cigs were 25 cents a pack!!!!!!!!!
  • I think gas was 50 cents, all I know was it took 5 bucks to fill my Bug and I could drive forever on that, bread don't recall guess around 75 cents!
  • I don't drive, but I can remember when a loaf of bread was 23 cents. My mother can remember when it was 2 cents!
  • I remember gas being .99 cents and going up over 1 dollar. Because the pumps weren't able to calculate above .99 and the attendants had to manually make the calculations on all sales until the pumps were updated. I know it was lower than that, but that stands out in mind for some reason.
  • I remember gas being 23cents a gallon and bread was around 30 cents a loaf.
  • I remember helping my GrandPa set the gas pumps at 31 cents a gallon for ethyl and 27 cents a gallon for regular. Bread was 15 cents a loaf, with sale prices at 10/$1.
  • Well, I'm not that old...Gas was maybe the cheapest that I was old enough to remember was at maybe like 78 cents a gallon. now bread is still I guess reasonable...99 cents a loaf
  • I think bread was 19 cents a loaf when I was a kid and gas was about 32 cents to a gallon.
  • I remember when gas was $1.24 per gallon.
  • it used to be at one point in time , $1.09 and the loaf of bread used to be 89 cents.
  • I remember in the early '70's it was about .50 cents a gallon for gas, but then there was a big energy crisis and the prices went up to around $1.00. Bread was about .79 cents and a gallon of milk was about $1.25
  • Gas - .69 Bread - .49
  • I remember regular gas as low as 27 cents a gallon when I got my driver's license. Bread about 21 cents a loaf. Wonder Bread.
  • I remember gas being 99 cents per gallon. I think bread was about 69 cents a loaf then.
  • I was traveling with my family in 1973 from Ohio to Florida. There was a gas war in Georgia along route 75. The price of gas was .27 cents per gallon. We filled up both going to Florida and coming back from Florida. The gas prices in Ohio at the time were about .32 cents per gallon. Stew
  • Gas: .19 cents and bread? not sure, Mom made our own for a long time . . . I think a nickel.
  • I remember sitting in my mother's car while she was in the grocery store and watching two gas stations across the street from each other having a gas war. It got down to .09 cents a gallon that day.
  • 27.9 in 1971 at the local Hess station. Name brands like Esso were about 32.9. Sunoco 260 was outrageous at about 38.9 as I recall. Then there was the first oil embargo in late 73 when OPEC decided to punish the USA for supporting Israel. Gas went all the way up to 49.9 !!! Nobody cared how much it was, but there wasn't any gas to be had. Gas stations would open for an hour at a time and have lines a mile long. People would follow tankers down the highway to get to the station that got gas.
  • I am 71 years old and as a young man still in school and driving my fathers car on special occasions, I purchased gas for about .24 per gallon. I remember driving through Roseland, Indiana about the same time and experienced a gas war in that area and saw prices at .19 per gallon. I can also remember the nickel coke and the nickel candy bar, but would have to guess on the price of a loaf of bread at .15 per loaf.
  • Gasoline: 23 cents a gallon (Pomona, California--1962) Bread: 25 cents (white bread, store brand, Oceanside, California--1963)
  • I remember 22.9 but I was just a kid and only remember because my Grandmother who was driving was commenting on how cheap that was so she pulled in for a fill up even though she really didn't need it. When I started driving it was around 42 cents a gallon.
  • .69 cents per gallon
  • 12 cents a gallon for gas during a gas war. 19 cents a gallon elsewise in Arizona in 1968. At that time a loaf of Wonder or similar white bread sold for 17 cents for a 1-1/2 pound loaf. A two bedroom one bath house went typically for $12,000 and a Chevy II sold for $2200. Wages were typically in the area of $6000 a year, but jobs easy to find, stable and quite easy to live on the income. You could by tacos 12 for $1 at Jack in the Box. Cokes and candy bars 10 cents from a macine, even ceaper at a store. Wy doesn't someone invent a time machine? I want to go back!
  • Gasoline - 32 cents per gallon and bread 19 cents per loaf. When I started driving, gas was about 50 cents per gallon.
  • I remember less than 24 cents/gallon in the 60's when I first drove. You also got a strip of green stamps and a drinking glass if you filled up spending at least 5 dollars. The glass usually had some kind of local design on it, like a green tint and a raised image of a Saguaro Cactus.

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy