ANSWERS: 5
  • I understood that this should be applied to the back of the animals neck betweeen the shoulders, that is so they may not lick it. I have treated my dog for five years and never had any trouble with her even attempting to lick that area.
  • You can only apply between the shoulder blades they can not reach it there
  • Read the package and call the manufacturer. It may cause some minor neuroligical problems that should pass.
  • I offer this as information. Purely from MY perspective on Frontline the answer would be YES...it CAN hurt the dog! This is a debate, and I offer the information only because I believe that we all have the right to information. Frontline is poison, it kills fleas and ticks...which NO DEBATE are bad for your companion animals, and bad for you. I also believe that putting poison on your dog/cat is harmful. The way the manufacturers look at it is...they want to make money! They make money by "selling" their product and the idea of its use to all of us, including the medical profession dedicated to serving the needs of our companion animals health care. I believe, and so do many others...including many Vets, that poisoning our animals...even the "little bit" that products like this do, is unacceptable and a poor choice. Many Dogs and Cats have horrible reactions to these treatments. Skin eruptions, nerve problems, behavioral challenges...because they mess with the animal in ways we do NOT see...the way we would a rash or something of that nature. When you apply this or its relatives from the pharmacy to your animal, you are exposing the animal to a toxic substance. YOU are also exposing yourself, your children and anyone else who come into contact with the animal to a topical skin absorbed poison. A good replacement, that works and is safe for your, your family and your animal...is NEEMS OIL. It also comes in a soap. You can either find NEEMS on line...just run a google search or often at your local health foods store. I know Fresh Foods carries it. The oil there costs me about $20 and lasts a long time. One for such a small dog a few more for a larger animal...applied once every 2 weeks should work in a highly infested area. (if you are walking your dog around creeks, streams, or other areas where ticks tend to live; or have major problems with fleas or your dog is exposed to other dogs who have fleas/ticks on a routine basis.) You can also add drops to water in a small spray bottle to make a spray that will help with horseflies on your horse, as well as skeeters! You can also use it on yourself and your children. While I maintain that EVERY substance, food, drink, herb, fiber, medication WILL HAVE someone who has a negative reaction to it; NEEMS I have thus far NOT heard of any negative reactions. Our Pregnant neighbor received a green light to use it this summer against skeeters by her Dr. I offer this as an alternative to using a known toxin. If you want to learn more do a bit of research on the topic. http://www.doggiebag.com has some articles on it in their holistic care forum, and there are many other sites that provide both pro and con.
  • I just had the same problem with my cat. We placed the frontline between her shoulder blades, and right after, she leaned back and licked the spot. She is almost 8 months old, and I am worried. But not treating them is not an option since we live in an apartment where the landlord will NOT treat the yard for fleas, etc, making our home and animals a haven for such parasites.

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