ANSWERS: 16
  • You can only eat vegetable chicken that are grown on plants in the field. and vegan ... if you're even thinking about eating chicken... that's not a good start for vegan cancel that last remark - I misread the question
  • No - chicken is not a vegetable. Which raises the question of why you are a vegetarian. The answer should tell you whether you want to eat chicken, regardless of what the label is. The commonest reason to be vegetarian is to avoid killing things. Chickens have to be killed, so it would by hypocritical to eat them and call yourself vegetarian. But some people don't want to eat red meat. In which case they can eat chicken, but are not vegetarian.
  • Meat is meat - lots of people restrict consumption of red meat but still eat poultry, fish, etc., but that's not vegetarian.
  • No, if you are a vegetarian you don't eat meat. Chicken is meat. A vegetarian is a 'no meat' eater. If you want to eat chicken, but no other meat, then why label yourself? Just eat what feels good for you. If someone asks you for diner, just say that the only meat you eat is chicken. If a label doesn't feel right for you, then don't use it.
  • Only chicken eggs. Not the meat. For some strange reason, some people think of fish as 'not meat', but if it has muscle, what else could it be?
  • It is impossible. You would be a reduced meat-eater. Every little bit you do towards being a reduced meat-eater helps us all in numerous ways.
  • Yes and no. This would not make you a vegetarian, but rather a pollotarian. From wikipedia: Pollotarianism — A diet that excludes all meat except poultry and fowl.
  • YOu can eat what you like...you don't have to live by anyone else's rules in regards to food.
  • No. A vegetarian is someone who does not eat meat products, and chicken is, obviously, meat.
  • You can eat however or whatever you want! I see nothing wrong with your choice of omitting certain meats, but I don't think you would necessarily quaify as a true "vegetarian" though. But you certainly would qualify as someone who was mindful about their diet. :)
  • No, vegetarian means not eating anything with a FACE on it.
  • No, vegetarians do not eat any form of meat - that's why they're called vegetarians. :-)
  • 1) Only chicken *eggs*! A vegetarian is principally a person who is not eating animals. A vegan is a person who is not eating animals and not using any animal products like eggs, honey, dairy products, leather, etc. If you are supporting animal rights, you could also decide that some animals are more worth supporting than others. Mammals could be considered more worth supporting because humans are also mammals. So you could abstain from eating mammal meat but still eat chicken, which are birds, or eat fish, reptiles and insects. However, in the moment where you are eating chicken, you do not fulfill the definition of a vegetarian any more. 2) "Vegetarianism is the practice of a diet that excludes meat (including game and slaughter by-products), fish (including shellfish and other sea animals) and poultry. There are several variants of the diet, some of which also exclude eggs and/or some products produced from animal labour such as dairy products and honey. A vegan diet is a form of vegetarianism which excludes all animal products from the diet, such as meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, eggs, and honey. Those who practice veganism for ethical reasons exclude animal products from their diet as part of a larger practice of abstaining from the use of animals for any purpose (e.g. leather, fur, etc.), often out of support for animal rights. Most vegetarians consume dairy products, and many eat eggs. Lacto-vegetarianism includes dairy products but excludes eggs - ( as practiced by Vegetarian Hindu people of India ), ovo-vegetarianism includes eggs but not dairy, and lacto-ovo vegetarianism includes both eggs and dairy products." Source and further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetarianism
  • The best way to answer your question is for you to first witness where and how the chickens or turkeys come to your plate by watching a short video below. After that, I'm sure you'll be able to answer your own question with black and white clarity.

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