ANSWERS: 8
  • That's Plaque! Certain bacteria that are in your mouth all the time will cause this to form. If you leave plaque on your teeth it will harden and become Tartar. Tartar and plaque, when left un-checked, lead to tooth decay. Fortunately your body can deal with plaque. Throughout the day your mouth produces saliva which will break down a lot of the plaque and fight the bacteria causing it. That's why this is worst after sleeping. Saliva is not strong enough to do much to tartar and it may be that certain elements in your saliva combined with plaque have actually helped form the tartar, for this you'll need a professional cleaning to get rid of. As for the plaque, brushing loosens and will get rid of it for the most part and some sort of antiseptic mouthwash will kill most of those bacteria causing it. Some bacteria will always remain and will immediately begin producing plaque again. If you brush/mouthwash right before you go to bed you've cleaned off what was there and feel fresh (no slime) in the mouth, but you've also cleaned out some of your natural helpers in fighting these bacteria that cause plaque. Now that your mouth is "clean" you go to bed and the bacteria throw a party (a very slimy party). By the time you wake up you've been "Slimed" with plaque. One suggestion would be try brushing and/or mouth washing well before you go to bed (maybe half to a full hour before). This will give your body a chance to start producing some helpers (bouncers for the party) that will come in your saliva. Then you'll slow down those nasty bacteria with your own defense mechanisms. Another thing to do would be, if you wake at night use some plain water to rinse your mouth and the pre-mature plaque out (It is okay to swallow plaque, Yum). Ask your dentist- there may be specific pastes or mouthwash to help in this fight. You may also look at your diet. Certain foods can change the chemical components in your mouth. Often after dinner it's time for dessert (usually sweets or the like) you may try eating fruits or other oxidant rich foods even take your vitamins in the evening to help produce healthy saliva before you go to bed. (It's not just sugar left on teeth that can feed the plaque producing bacteria but natural chemicals produced as a by-product of eating those sweets.) Hope this'll be helpful.
  • Do you brush your tongue? Lots of nasty things accumulate there, too. Also, do you drink enough liquids? You may have not enough saliva to move the stuff along. Caffienated drinks like coffee, soda, etc, not only don't count, they actually hurt because they are diuretics, and move water out of your body. I know its boring, but try drinking more water.
  • One time I over-used a whitening mouthwash and woke up in the morning with a white film where my teeth meet my gums, and I think the peroxide in the mouthwash burned my gums.
  • It could mean that you are a mouth breather and should seek a doctors advice. i have the same problem and constantly have a gum infection, after years of the dentist constantly telling to me to floss they realized i couldn't breath through my nose right, i am now in the process have getting braces and a Palatal expander to open the nasal passages and widen my upper arch.
  • Try sleeping on your stomach. See if that makes a difference.
  • Every dentist I have talked to insists that you do not need toothpaste or any of the commercial chemical treatments. It is brushing that does the job. Your teeth absorb minerals out of the saliva through the surfaces and that is why you want to keep the surfaces clean. I am guessing now: the coating you describe might be carbohydrates, which is to say sweet stuff and white breads. You should only eat whole grain breads, for a lot of reasons. That alone might correct your slime problem. Study some books about nutrition so you will know how to eat right. The most popular introduction to the field is the series by Adele Davis, even though her books are fifty years old. www.amazon.com/Adelle-Davis/e/B001J3RULO
  • Every dentist I have talked to insists that you do not need toothpaste or any of the commercial chemical treatments. It is brushing that does the job. Your teeth absorb minerals out of the saliva through the surfaces and that is why you want to keep the surfaces clean. I am guessing now: the coating you describe might be carbohydrates, which is to say sweet stuff and white breads. You should only eat whole grain breads, for a lot of reasons. That alone might correct your slime problem. Study some books about nutrition so you will know how to eat right. The most popular introduction to the field is the series by Adele Davis, even though her books are fifty years old. www.amazon.com/Adelle-Davis/e/B001J3RULO
  • Goodness that is normal - that is a reason you brush your teeth in the morning.
    • XIX
      Yep!
    • Loan Market
      Its ok.

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