ANSWERS: 4
  • I'm single so I can't find my emergency kit anyway. 😆
    • Linda Joy
      Well, its not like someone else moved it! It should be where you left it! Guess you can just sit and worry and cry in pain because you can't find your emergency kit with your pain killers in it!
    • Rick Myres
      Aspirin, Tylenol, ibuprofen, at regular strength don't touch my pain unless it's only something like a headache. If I take them for my usual 24/7 pain they only upset my tummy. Even if I eat. Lol
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Rick, Sillie Willie. I see what you mean when you are in the dark alone without your emergency kit to keep you company. lol
    • Rick Myres
      It could be a good replacement for a security blanket? Lo l
    • Linda Joy
      Not really, but you should have a blankie in there. I can't take Ibuprofen. Have you tried giving up sugar? My pain level went down when I cut my sugar.
    • Rick Myres
      What????? Sugar contributes to pain??? Whoodah known?
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Rick, forget the blanket and try some booty call. It works for many men, ROTFL.
    • Rick Myres
      Tee hee he he
    • Linda Joy
      Oh yeah! STD's - The gift that keeps on giving!
  • I have several. Long term and short term kits.
    • Linda Joy
      Let me guess, one is in the car?
    • Archie Bunker
      My Get Home Bag is always in the car. Small enough to carry long distance in case I have to walk home from wherever I am. And I'm pretty well prepared to last several months without electricity once I get home.
    • Linda Joy
      Hopefully the home will still be there! You're a smart guy in a lot of ways!
    • Archie Bunker
      "By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail." - Benjamin Franklin
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, a Get Home Bag? More Americans are forced to reside in their vehicles if they don't have any other alternative$: https://www.citylab.com/equity/2019/02/homeless-safe-parking-lots-sleeping-in-cars-city-programs/581128/
    • Archie Bunker
      We're not discussing homelessness, Jenny. That's a whole other topic. The question was regarding emergency kits.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, we're discussing homelessness now. You implied your Get Home Bag is always in your car. I'm assuming you will not mind "living in your car" as many homeless people in America do by the link I provided or I misunderstood your advice. During a catastrophic event, there is nothing wrong about living in a vehicle. It's not my type of living, but whatever it takes for people to accommodate themselves is all that matters.
    • Archie Bunker
      Yes, my bag is always in my car, and during a catastrophic event, there are better options that living in your car. In many cases, you're best option might be to be moving, not stationary. Stationary targets are easy targets. As far as homelessness, ask a question and get that thread going.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "As far as homelessness, ask a question and get that thread going." Not necessarily, you are not being specific in your answer. You say you have several long term and short term kits without elaborating. Then you claim your bag is always in your car. I am getting mixed signals here. Living in a vehicle and keeping your bag in your car resemble each other. If you don't mind me asking, what is your bag doing in your car? Why not leave your bag at home? Very confusing.
    • Archie Bunker
      We're talking emergency kits, Jenny. I have a bag in my car that has enough emergency supplies to get me home. Food, shelter, water & ammunition. It's enough for probably a week in case I have to walk home from a good distance. Staying with your vehicle is usually not going to be the best option. Vehicles are big targets. Once I get home I have enough supplies to last quite a while. And enough other gear to defend it if necessary. I also have another bag (bug out bag) ready in case I have to abandon my home and move out on foot. It has enough to keep me going in case I can never return home. Everything is ready to go. Being prepared for an emergency doesn't make it as much of an emergency. When I think of emergency kit, I think of what you have prepared for a real emergency, not losing your job and being evicted. Collapse of the power grid. Natural disaster. Collapse of the government. Those are true emergencies. Do you have anything prepared? What will you do if we loose power for months on end? Solar flares disrupt the power grid all the time and create major inconveniences for many people. What happens if it's out for 6 months? Do you have anything prepared or are you going to rely on the government to help Jenny Rizzo?
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, where did I say we weren't talking about emergency kits? I was just trying to get you to clarify on what exactly do you mean about your emergency kit, and why is it stored in your car, as I was moving on already. But, since it appears you are turning this subject into a discussion, then this is why I'm still here. A vehicle has always been important for almost any emergency, just as long as a person has plenty of money to keep the gas tank full until the power is restored. One of the main reasons why cars have become more prevalent and important is because it is an easy mode of transportation. You don't need to rely on public transportation for your daily commutes any more, and can enjoy the liberty and independence that comes with a car.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "Do you have anything prepared?" The question in this subject is not specific. If Answerbag had the downgrade feature, I would downgrade it, cause the reference Linda Joy provided in the strictest sense is referring to a 2-3 day power outage. My preparations are mentioned in my answer, along with my comments (depending on the types of disasters). Quote: "Staying with your vehicle is usually not going to be the best option." That's not my option and I don't support it. All I can say is: it is reasonable for homeless people to live in their vehicles other than a vacant house. During major power outages, a vehicle is used to get around or basically live in it temporarily if you have no other place to go to make a better living.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "Collapse of the government. Those are true emergencies." The realest of emergencies are cyber attacks. They can be socially or politically motivated attacks on government agencies, defense and high tech companies which can lead to a blackout. If that ever happens in this modern era with madman leaders who promote terrorism, the possibilities of living 6 months to talk about it are slim and none. I have military training and I have been around the world. To go on Survival Mode during a blackout, living with my rural friends would be my last option. They breed chickens, ducks, pigs, goats, and there's even a nice lake nearby to enjoy life. Now that's a splash. lol Don't mind me. I'm laughing because life is too good to be true. :D
    • Archie Bunker
      I see nowhere in Linda's question anything relating to any time frame, let alone a 2-3 day power outage. My initial answer indicated that I have several bags (long & short term) and you then brought up homelessness. I'm not sure how my initial response had anything to do with homelessness. Now, if you want to talk about staying in your vehicle for the duration of a long term catastrophe, be my guest. Just know that unlike on TV, gas doesn't last forever. It does have a shelf life of 6-12 months and then it's useless. A person sitting in a stationary vehicle is easy prey. And with no power, the gas pumps won't work anyway so you'll have to siphon from other sources. And you'll be competing with other people who are trying the same thing. Lastly, I also go with the old adage of "If you can't defend what you have, you're just collecting it for someone else who'll take it."
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "I see nowhere in Linda's question anything relating to any time frame, let alone a 2-3 day power outage." Exactly, Linda Joy did not provide enough reference to see if she is referring to a typical power outage or a major power outage. She mentioned a flashlight and a hand cranked lantern. Again, that sounds like a 2-3 day power outage kit. Quote: "A person sitting in a stationary vehicle is easy prey." I'm not arguing against it. In a state of complete chaos, anybody living their vehicles will be at risk of getting hijacked by panic attacks in the city.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "I'm not sure how my initial response had anything to do with homelessness." I wouldn't say the word anything, cause you stated: "My Get Home Bag is always in the car." Not only me, other users who are curious to know why your Get Home Bag is in your car brings up the thought of homeless people HAVING MORE THAN ONE BAG in their vehicles. I don't know if you are homeless or not. It seems like your emergency bag is in your car so you can move around from place to place. I don't see what's the big deal of storing this bag of yours in your home. If it's loaded, then it is understandable to leave it in your car to prevent others in your home from going through it. lol
    • Archie Bunker
      By your comments, you seem to have no idea what a Get Home Bag is. https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/how-to-build-a-get-home-bag-book-giveaway/ Or you can try this one. https://www.activeresponsetraining.net/more-important-than-the-bug-out-bag-the-get-home-bag
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, by my comments I seem to have no idea what a Get Home Bag is, but I do KNOW it doesn't take a genius to make a tote bag into a Build A Kit bag: https://www.ready.gov/build-a-kit You will have to try harder to hold a discussion with me. Whichever bag a person chooses to make is based on personal preference. One thing for sure, you won't survive long . There isn't much food or water you can store in your emergency bag to keep you going for months during a major catastrophe. Food and water will be the first thing people in the city will be massively rushing into. How wise lol, and you have the audacity to question me over a question that is referring to a typical power outage by the reference Linda Joy provided? This deserves a facepalm.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, very funny of you for dodging my comments. I'm not asking what TYPE of bag it is or the the SIZE of it. Again, you said your bag is always in your car. For the THIRD time and I quote: "My Get Home Bag is always in the car." It sounds like you are homeless moving from place to place. If your hometown is going to get hit with a tsunami by the first link you provided, obviously you and your car will go along for a ride. At least the Ramen noodles will serve its purpose.
    • Archie Bunker
      You're not supposed to survive on a get home bag, Jenny. That's why it's a get home bag, not a survive for the rest of your life bag. It's up to you to have enough to survive on in whatever location you choose. If you need that pointed out, obviously you're playing on a different field than I expected. But if you go back to my response to Linda, you'll see that I stated there was enough in my get home bag to sustain me if I had to walk home. Home. That plainly excludes homelessness, by definition. And again, I'm pretty sure that Linda made no reference to what type of emergency or how long it would last during our comments or in her initial question. That was you who decided you'd base you answer and responses on a "typical power outage." I made no reference to that, nor did Linda in her responses. And you can facepalm yourself all you want, but not once did I mention homelessness or living in my car, until you brought it up. Being ignorant of what a get home bag is, you assumed that that was what it's for. But now you should be painfully aware what happens when you assume, which is why the saying exists. "Assumption is the mother of all fuck-ups."
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "You're not supposed to survive on a get home bag, Jenny. That's why it's a get home bag, not a survive for the rest of your life bag." And that's why you are in no position to challenge my expertise on a question that you can't prove the time period of a power outage.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "It's up to you to have enough to survive on in whatever location you choose." My location of survival is not based on city thinking. Avoiding the nuisance of the city on a daily basis is not the best sight for many people. Talk about a major catastrophe were an uncontrolled amount of people massively will be in chaos. Quote: "But if you go back to my response to Linda, you'll see that I stated there was enough in my get home bag to sustain me if I had to walk home." Not quite, you are talking about being prepared for SEVERAL MONTHS in a Get Home Bag. You'll need a miracle to live that long without having plenty of food and water to store in your emergency bag.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "Home. That plainly excludes homelessness, by definition." Not precisely to the strictest sense. You might think people living in their vehicles are only packing bags of clothes without knowing that most of them have an emergency bag filled with first aid kits and packaged foods to get them through the day. Furthermore, they are not geniuses for living in their vehicles, but they can use some common sense when building an emergency kit.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie bunker, quote: "And again, I'm pretty sure that Linda made no reference to what type of emergency or how long it would last during our comments or in her initial question." Again and again to repeat myself, I made it clear that her question is not specific. If I'm going to ask a question, I am going to provide enough reference if not more than enough reference so the answerer can give me a detailed answer.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "I made no reference to that, nor did Linda in her responses. And you can facepalm yourself all you want," But nowhere will you find any errors in my answer nor my comments, since my answer has plenty of details stating how will I get by a 2-3 day power outage. The faceplam has not left your side, because you are asking me WHAT WILL I DO. When things do go your way, assumptions are to blame - when you made more than one assumption in my answer based on a question that does not target major catastrophes: http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/3515078#a8840649 Another facepalm. I have plenty of facepalms to give if you are in need of more. In case you don't know what a facepalm is, it means to be put to shame by faulty reasoning.
    • Archie Bunker
      Ok, well, I have no idea WTF you're trying to argue here. Your first comment makes absolutely no sense so I'm not going to address it. Second comment, a get home bag is not supposed to sustain you for several months, so I don't know how the hell you think that I'm saying that. Common sense tells most of us that are paying attention that you can't carry around enough food for several months in a bag. Third comment, why do you keep bringing up homelessness? It has nothing to do with my comment. You're just pulling that out of your ass for some reason. Fourth comment, Linda got my answer, so I'm not sure why you think that it wasn't specific enough. And it even if you think it wasn't specific enough, maybe you should have asked me to clarify instead of assuming that I was talking about power outages and homelessness. Last one, you can talk facepalms all you want. You can roll your facepalms and shame into little balls and then figure out where they can go. That does absolutely nothing for me. And all of this is not based on your answer, Jenny. If you look up at the very top of this, you'll see that it's MY answer here that you started all these comments on. On your answer, I asked you questions and then made a statement. You just want to seem to argue with me because you made assumptions on MY response to someone else's question. Maybe you need to go chill out somewhere and collect your thoughts.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Quote: "Ok, well, I have no idea WTF you're trying to argue here." ??? I must be asking you that, since you weren't being specific in your answer. By not adding enough details in your answer: it is a good way of adding bait to start discussions. This is why I'm here, to question you and to bring up what resembles your position. My earliest of comments are about homeless people living in their vehicles. You said your emergency kit is in your vehicle - when there is no way to depend on a Get Home Bag if a tsunami causes a complete wipe out in your hometown. Quote: "Third comment, why do you keep bringing up homelessness?" They too have emergency bag kits to speak of emergency bags being left in a vehicle, just like yourself.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Quote: "Fourth comment, Linda got my answer, so I'm not sure why you think that it wasn't specific enough." Any answer can be given, although when there is a lack of details, AB'ers like myself will stop by in people's comments to get further details. You shouldn't be upset by using profanity. We can all comment were we feel like it. Quote: "You can roll your facepalms and shame into little balls and then figure out where they can go." What a vulgar expression. No class whatsoever. I did start off this discussion to see if you can elaborate with your Get Home Bag. If you don't like it when users tend to argue as you say, then be specific in every way you can.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Your answer stated: "I have several. Long term and short term kits." A good answer would have been, why do you have several kits, why do you think it is better to store them in your vehicle, instead of the strurdiest place in a home, perhaps a basement, what types of medical kits do you store in them, along with certain foods to survive, how about some self-defense weapons when the authorities are not around in a state of complete chaos, etc.
    • Archie Bunker
      "A good answer would have been...." Then ask a question, Jenny. Don't assume I'm talking about homeless people when I answered the original question. I answered according to what I have, not to what other people have. What homeless people have is not in my interest area. If you wanted to know why I have several kits, then ask, don't assume. Ask why I have different bags and what they are for. You're taking what you think and trying to fit it into what you think it should be. Doesn't work that way.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, I don't have the need to ask question at the moment. Your answer leads to assumptions. I don't see why you didn't give a detailed answer. I see your answer more as bait for not being specific. You mention several survival kit bags in your car, then the sense of homelessness comes to mind - when it was as simple to say in your answer that you leave your short and long term emergency bags in your vehicle, (due to) catastrophic events. You claim it doesn't work that way, I claim giving good answers if not great is how it works so you could avoid me or other AB'ers from questioning your answer.
    • Archie Bunker
      It was your mistake to assume, Jenny. If you wanted clarity in my answer, you should have asked instead of assuming. In my first response to you, as you can read, I told you that I wasn't talking about homelessness and yet you continued with that. Your mistake, not mine.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, I don't make mistakes on Q&A sites. I always edit my answers and comments if I see a mistake. What we have here is a misunderstanding. 1. You weren't being specific in your answer. 2. It came to mind why you would leave some sort of emergency bags stored in your vehicle. (Due to) a lack of details or as you say clarity, it seemed as if you were living in your car to get mixed signals. As the comments went on, you clarified the "purpose" of the emergency bags.
    • Archie Bunker
      If I wasn't being specific enough for you, then ask a freakin question. Don't assume. So yes, you did make a mistake. Even after I told it nothing to do with what you brought up, you continued to carry that water.
    • Linda Joy
      Jenny has no idea what she's talking about and claiming to be an expert AS USUAL! I knew exactly what you were talking about. A get home bag is what you need to get home if your car stalls. There are also 24 and 72 hour kits. And Jenny doesn't ask questions because she thinks she already knows everything - but only about half a dozen subjects!! And when she does post a question its not to learn what you think but to tell you what SHE THINKS. And then she posts crap like this showing how little she knows about what she thinks she knows. Non specific questions get a wider perspective, and there is nothing wrong with them. If I recall correctly she was kicked off another site for being a bitch and arguing with everyone over nothing.
    • Archie Bunker
      I don't know about all of that, but I get what you're saying, Linda. It seems pretty reasonable to think that if someone isn't being specific, you can simply as to clarify. Instead, she kept kicking the same dead homeless horse.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Hello ya, I couldn't get back to ya. I have been so busy in the past week.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Archie Bunker, quote: "If I wasn't being specific enough for you, then ask a freakin question." Uhh, my English doesn't differ from yours or any other AB'er to say you weren't being specific in your answer. I've been on the new Answerbag since 2017. It's not new anymore, but I do know until now in 10/15/19 hardly no one likes to question other AB'ers to avoid discussions. If an answer was not helpful, we can feel free to leave comments. It is exactly what I'm doing - trying to figure out why would you store your emergency bags in your vehicle. There is no mistake about that. It's simply a question in a socializing site.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Linda Joy, quote: "I knew exactly what you were talking about. A get home bag is what you need to get home if your car stalls." If your car stalls? LOL, you are living in the past. Ditching your car and going for a long walk in this era is more dangerous than picking up hitchhikers. Haven't you heard of technology? With one call you'll be out of the middle of nowhere instantly. EVERYONE READING, this is why answers should be given with details.
    • Archie Bunker
      Jenny, if you're trying to figure out why people store emergency bags in their vehicles, then ask. You're still working on your assumptions, including the ones about avoiding discussions. Give it up, dear.
  • Lipitor, Oh wait! I just found out it causes wasting away of muscles that does not go away after you stop taking it. Forget that!
  • My emergency kit is simple and reliable. It includes a flashlight, a pack of batteries, an LED lantern to place in a room, and most importantly a fast USB car charger to charge my mobile device in a power outage. Having a flashlight app is also important to find your way around night and even send signals.
    • Archie Bunker
      What happens if you're without electricity for a couple of weeks?
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Plan B will include to stay at a hotel. Extended Stay America offers fully equipped kitchens, on-site laundry and free Wi-Fi with discounted weekly rates. Gotta love life!
    • Archie Bunker
      And when the power grid is down?
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Plan C includes paying $700-$1100.00 a week to rent a generator. Once again, life is beautiful!
    • Archie Bunker
      And how are you going to pay it if there is no power? Credit cards will be useless.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Let me educate here old-timer. Store transactions are done temporarily with cell phones and tablets during power outages. If I have to go all out and buy one depending on the crisis, then why not? Again and again, it's a beautiful life!
    • Archie Bunker
      Well, you can't convince people to prepare for the worst until it hits them in the face. It's folly to ASSUME that there will be people willing to sell supplies to someone who only has a credit card, especially considering a long term blackout. Or worse yet, expect the government to take care of them. That's the herd mentality. The strong survive and the weak? Well.... All I'll say is, good luck with that.
    • Jenny Rizzo
      You're right, I can't convince people to prepare for the worst, now that me, myself and I and my family is what comes first than anything else. So for the weak, you wouldn't even want to imagine what would happen in every city of the US during a long term blackout. Think of a Zombie Apocalypse.
    • Linda Joy
      You can buy a generator for less than 500 - BEFORE the power outage. Guess I'll rent mine to you!!! hehe. And you can buy a hand cranked phone charger for less than 10. Does MS I know everything not know this?
    • Jenny Rizzo
      Linda Joy, thanks for your suggestion. A hand cranked phone charger is a great idea to have, although if power isn't restored in a 3 month period during a state of emergency, cell phones would no longer be needed in comparison to a generator. I was thinking more of a Generac Standby Generator that costs over $5000.00. For $500.00 dollars, that's peanuts to me. So there you have it Archie, life is indeed beautiful!

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