ANSWERS: 6
  • I'm gonna guess ... "China" ... Am I double lucky ??
    • Linda Joy
      Nope that would be too easy
    • Ice man
      : )
    • Azlotto
      Lol...I wish I was single lucky.
    • Linda Joy
      You are!
    • Ice man
      I think everybody should get lucky at least once a week ... if not more !
    • Linda Joy
      I'm a very lucky person, both good and bad luck! Though I suspect what you're alluding to as luck for me is a choice, and has more to do with skill and confidence than luck.
    • Linda Joy
      Are you 'double lucky' Ice man?
    • Ice man
      At least twice a week.
  • I believe the fortune cookie is an American invention.
    • Linda Joy
      Yes! But where?
    • Azlotto
      San Francisco.
    • Ice man
      Yeah .. okay ... and what was the address ??? Hahahahahahaha
    • mushroom
      Was it the "Sum Dum Goy" factory from "The Last Dragon"?
    • Linda Joy
      And Azlotto wins!! I was both surprised and disappointed to learn this.
    • Linda Joy
      Although I suspect mushroom may be right as well.
  • According to Iron-Man 3 it's an American concoction.
    • Linda Joy
      That it is! And Iron Man is hot!
    • Anoname
      Now I'm jealous of Iron-Man.
    • Anoname
      My Mother died in my arms 10 minutes after watching Iron-Man 3 at home for the first time. That is a memorable movie for me.
  • probably china
    • Linda Joy
      No, but if you had read the other answers you'd know!
  • This is a very interesting story. A cookie made in the exact shape of the modern American-Chinese "fortune cookie," including the folded message on paper inside, was traditionally baked in Kyoto, Japan, dating back to at least the mid-1800's. However, these cookies were more of a savory flavour and were notably larger and darker than their modern counterparts. Their recipe contained rice flour, sesame, and miso, and they can still be found in the area as a local snack. Around the turn of the 19th-20th century, in San Francisco, California, a Japanese businessman started baking similar cookies to the traditional Japanese ones, but flavoring them with butter and sugar, in order to appeal to American diners. Roundabout 20 years later, an orange flavoured cookie appeared in Chinese-American restaurants in Los Angeles, California. Sometime around the USA's entry into WW II, the Japanese origins of the cookie were swept under the rug in order to avoid cultural backlash. The origin of the cookie is still hotly debated among Californians, but, in my opinion, the true conception of the idea is from Kyoto, as it is very well documented that the cookie's presence there predates the American version by at least 50 years, and sweet versions of the cookie, although less documented, do seem to have likely existed before 1900 in Japan as well. Fun fact, though, in the early 1990's American companies tried exporting fortune cookies into mainland China, and Chinese consumers thought they were strange and dumb, and the idea failed to generate any sort of splash, but since the mid-2000's, you can sometimes get a "Chinese" fortune cookie in China, but only if you dine at a specifically "American" Chinese restaurant in China. Chinaception.
    • Linda Joy
      I liked this excerpt: "San Francisco's Court of Historical Review attempted to settle the dispute in 1983. During the proceedings, a fortune cookie was introduced as a key piece of evidence with a message reading, "S.F. Judge who rules for L.A. Not Very Smart Cookie". A federal judge of the Court of Historical Review determined that the cookie originated with Hagiwara and the court ruled in favor of San Francisco. Subsequently, the city of Los Angeles condemned the decision." Hahaha! I think the old Japanese version is a different thing entirely! Its not even a cookie! Its more like a chip.
    • bostjan64
      Bwahaha! "Not very smart cookie" - good think I swallowed my water before reading that! But, not, it's not like a chip. Here is a link to an image showing both the Japanese traditional cookie and the American side-by-side: https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQyID_XKWVqCvlSoki6wPSGUkJ6JlBclyhQnuKxBcslnyjQpJ_- it's pretty much the same concept. The shape is 90% the same, the folded paper message is there, and texture is also about 90% the same. The differences are minor: less sweet, more nutty, darker colouration, paper is in the "elbow" instead of inside of the inner cavity, slightly larger. There are also some variations in the traditional version documented, so it's likely that there was a sweet version of the cookie made before the USA version came along. With that in mind, if you still think it's something entirely different, that's fine - it's just my opinion that the USA version is close enough to the range of variation of the Japanese traditional version that I don't consider it a novel "invention" as much as a slight adaptation.
    • Linda Joy
      I don't care what they look like or the similarities, if its not sweet its not a cookie! Which reminds me of another quote "Oatmeal raisin cookies that look like chocolate chip cookies are the reason I have trust issues!" Frankly, I like them both.
    • bostjan64
      Yeah, I get it. It's pretty common in the USA to have that expectation. But what if it's usually semi-sweet savory and sometimes semi-savory sweet? I really love these little Indian cookies you can get that are quite sweet, but also spicy and salty all at the same time. It probably sounds gross to the uninitiated, but they are worth a try, you might like them.
  • no idea

Copyright 2018, Wired Ivy, LLC

Answerbag | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy