ANSWERS: 43
  • I always forgive and I never stay mad. Even when you told me I had a big Nose.
  • Depends on what they said and what they meant. I'm more concerned about some of my flaws than others. If it was a slip or a tease and they weren't being mean, I'd let it go and laugh it off in a heartbeat. If they were trying to be mean to me it would take a rant at my husband to calm down and a couple days to forgive. Even after I'd forgiven them I probably wouldn't hang out with them again.
  • it would depend on who they were and what relationship we had and the intent on the comment wether malicious or pointing out your individuality
  • Really easy, because we all have them, and if I want I'll just point out theirs. The really bad ones too.
  • For me, it would be hard. Unforgivable. My flaws are not of choice but by heredity.
  • It would sting for a minute, but I think I could forgive them on the spot as long as they weren't trying to be hurtful.
  • Since I am my own worst critic, it wouldn't be any harder than forgiving myself. +5
  • Depends on the flaw and how bad the commentary was.
  • What's to forgive? I'm not that touchy. I find it better to have a thicker hide. :-) +5
  • Very easy, because I've learned that 9 times out of 10 critical people are really just looking in the mirror. Sane people only ever do that which feels good to them. Criticizing my flaws feels good to them because it is a way of feeling better about themselves. They obviously have not made peace with their own shortcomings, which exposes a vulnerability in them, not me.
  • What's to forgive? They're probably only stating the obvious! lol :^D
  • I didn't realize commenting on a physical flaw that exists requires forgiveness afterwards. So I suppose very easy.
  • i dont mind as long as they keep annoying me with it. Then it just gets idiotic =/.
  • This is a really hard question for me because people comment on my missing leg all the time. To some extent I simply have become hardened to stupid comments, and to some extent I have habituated to them so that comments make so little impression that I barely notice. Sometimes I get really fed up, especially when people make judgments about what I should or should not be wearing or how I choose to get around. A lot of comments seem pretty innocent and human. I make judgments about that all the time and tend to ignore the ones I think are innocent. But others are simply prejudiced or mean spirited, and then I find it extremely hard to forgive that sort of behavior. I realized that my feelings about this stuff vary a lot with time and context. I would react differently to the same comment at different times.
  • There is nothing to forgive. The person is a moron. Period.
  • It depends on the nature of the comment. If it was innocent or inquisitive and not rude, it shouldn;t be too hard to forgive someone for the comment. If it was a rude comment, then you may be dealing with a rude person that will have to earn your forgiveness.
  • I am still learning the virtue of forgiveness. I hope it would be easy for me.
  • probably not too hard
  • Why would I have to forgive them? Like most people, I have a catalogue of physical flaws, and anybody can comment on them if they see fit.
  • I don't forgive anyone who is mean. Unless the person says something positive and complimentary, I don't forgive. If it's a friend (that has never happened) it would hurt. If it's just any old body who cares? But they don't get a second chance. Once is quite enough for me! :)
  • Very easy... My S/O did that a few weeks ago, for example. I just bring it up every now and again to wind him up, but it doesn't bother me, he's right!
  • Depends on the person, intention, or the flaw. If they are just being mean and I don't give a rats ass about them, I'd probably point out a flaw of theirs (or make one up just to bug them - i.e. your nose is crooked, or one cheekbone is higher than the other). They'll be checking themselves out over and over after that! ha ha!
  • I don't know, I am an absolute doll. So, no one has ever commented negatively on my body and, if they did, I would assume it was jealousy. I suppose I could forgive them, yes.
  • If it ever happens. I'll let you know. lol Actually I would have no problem with it. Nobody is perfect.
  • I can't forget.
  • After I kill them I usually feel in a forgiving mood.
  • It is hurtful and rude to comment on someone's physical flaws. I can't imagine why someone would feel compelled to do so unless they are mean person or one who does it to make themselves feel superior. I have baby fine, curly hair and I hate it. I have a sister-in-law who was repeatdly making comments about my hair. She happens to be gorgeous with beautiful hair. I told her I found her comments hurtful and I would appreciate if she kept them to herself. She was very apologetic and has not mentioned my hair since. I did not say what I wanted to say - that at least God gave me a brain (she is not the brighest bulb in the world, nor well read or educated) because that would have been mean and hurtful. I wanted to but I didn't.
  • It's not difficult to forgive them, but YOU wont forget it any time soon!
  • who's flawless
  • Alot easier than it used to be. I have physical flaws I can't change due to surgeries from a chronic illness. I used to be very conscience of them, and so was everyone else. But, when I stopped hiding them people stopped commenting. I finally realized that no one can say anything about my scars that I haven't thought to myself already. So, why get upset with them? The impact comes from you believing what a person says about your flaws. What you see in yourself is what you should reflect for others to see. And by doing this your flaw(s) become less noticeable.
  • It's not what they say, but how they say it. Some years ago, I used to pass a blind beggar on a railway station bridge. The man literally had no face. Some people, especially teenage boys, used to poke fun at him. One day I got hold of two of them and gave them a dressing down for their unfeeling behaviour. When i was done, the beggar tells me quietly: "You shouldn't have admonished them, sir, they're too young to understand." That was the first time I got to speak to him. Over time we started exchanging occasional pleasantries, and one day I plucked up the courage to ask him about his face. He replied very matter-of-factly that he used to work in a factory and lost his face in an explosion. I was amazed at the fortitude with which he had accepted his situation. We all have flaws, Momma. If we accept them, we would be unperturbed by others' remarks. Let me tell you one more thing. My dad used to stammer a lot. Some of his business clients used to lose patience and say: "Okay, proceed further, will you?" My father never lost his cool, but used to ask them to wait a second while he regained his composure. Perhaps stammering is hereditary, and of late I've started too. I never used to, but I do now. Not as much as my dad, but sometimes. I'm a self-employed teacher. NONE of my students has ever made fun of me ... even behind my back. Their parents have told me that their child has remarked about it but has accepted it as an insignificant inconvenience which happens sometimes. See how understanding teenagers can be. That's why I love my students. They sometimes show more maturity and sense than adults.
  • Easy enough. My physical appearance is at the very bottom of my give a hoot list. It's quite a few lines below caring what others think about what I look.
  • Depends on who says it
  • Depends on whether its actually true and how tactful they are. Being truthful is nice, but being rude isn't cool.
  • Don't care about that... question my mental stability and I get really pissed. . Are you worried about something Momma? let me give you a check up... I'll let you know...
  • Apart from the balding patch, the grey hair, the fly-away beard, the pterygium (a clot of white tissue on the conjunctiva of my right eye), yellow, rather crooked teeth, a bunion (a karate injury) on my left foot, a scar about 18 inches long on my side when they went the long way round to remove my cancerous kidney, and a ribcage which looks as though it was put together as a nest by crow on LSD (perinatal whooping cough), and an assertive, not to say, aggressive demeanour, I am flawless, so naturally nobody has ever dared to comment on my barely perceptible departures from the Greek ideal to my face, so I have never had to decide how much to forgive. Having a sharp tongue I have no doubt I could respond to any such remark with sufficient withering savagery to make myself feel better and to dissuade the rash commenter from continuing.
  • . . . I'm a kindly chap when not provoked. The standard games theory types are doves and hawks: the doves always submit, the hawks always fight, but the retaliators act like a dove with the doves, and like a hawk with the hawks. I am a retaliator. Retaliators win.
  • Don't have any physical flaws. Mine are all mental.
  • Sure after Id told them where to go I can forgive *rarely* but ill never forget
  • I don't see why it is necessary for someone to comment on a physical flaw unless the person with the flaw asked for a comment--or if the comment or question is made with compassion as intent. It is unkind. Just ignore what they say -- don't answer. They'll get the message.
  • if i already accepted it, then it would be easy to forgive another and their comment. if their comment was respectful, no problem; if said in anger, then i'd have a harder time. i have the memory length of a goldfish, so, i'm blessed by not being physically able to hold onto anger long...
  • That depends on the flaw
  • Very easy

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