ANSWERS: 99
  • Blowing My Cover- About a CIA agent who left the agency and basically what it's all about Primary Colors- The Clinton Administration The Ancient Greek Historians- pretty self-explanitory
  • I am reading the Torah... which is odd for me; I have not really looked at its contents until now (I can't translate Hebrew). Fiction wise: I am reading Harry Potter book 4 which is quite good fun. I love the beginning of the book which describes the riddle house. :) Edit: Info on trolling. http://tinyurl.com/yyab85
  • the book i most commonly read right now is the bible. you may have heard of it before :p LOL.
  • I'm going to start to read Eragon and Eldest. The 2 books about this dragon. The movie for Eragon is out now. It seems like a really exciting book and I recommend it to other people.
  • I'm reading: "Imperial Life In The Emerald City: Inside Iraq's Green Zone" by Rajiv Chandrasekaran It's REALLY interesting and scary at the same time. It looks at the mismanagement of Baghdad and Iraq's early reconstruction by people who really had no business "running" an interim government, but through nepotism, found themselves in this position. and "Never Have Your Dog Stuffed - And Other Things I've Learned" by Alan Alda I'm actually rereading this, it's an awesome autobiography. He's a VERY funny guy, as I'm sure most would already realize. But he is also extremely intelligent and thoughtful. This is a book I would recommend. Ok, I'm done with the Alan Alda autobiography. Now it's a toss up between tackling the rest of "The Singularity Is Near - When Humans Transcend Biology" by Ray Kurzweil, which is a futurist's outlook for the continued co-evolution of people and technology, or "Breaking The Spell - Religion As A Natural Phenomenon" by Daniel C. Dennett, which traces human cultural and spiritual evolution.
  • Catch 22 and Shards.
  • What's a book? I'd better Google that...
  • The Fountain at the Centre of the World by Robert Newman, just started it and as ever really impressed so far with his work.
  • Birdsong, Room with a view, To the lighthouse (argh!), A winters tale, All quiet on the western front, regeneration, journeys end, just about to start reading another sodding war book! These are all for english, unsuprisingly I don't get a chance to read my own options atm.
  • I am reading 'Year of Wonders' by Geraldine Brooks. It about a village in Derbyshire in the North of England during the Plague in the 1600's.
  • A book about parakeets, I have two of them and they are so much harder to train then my tiel and bigger parrots!
  • Murphy's boy by Torey Hayden 7th book I am reading of hers and I have two more waiting!
  • I just finished reading two books. The first one was "The Innocent Man" by John Grisham. If you think our judicial system is at all fair, read this book. Gives ya something to think about. The second book was "Dear John" by Nicholas Sparks. If you know anyone in the military struggling with relationship issues have them read this one. It was very touching, but then again most of his books are.
  • I'm back into the Narnia books...just started Voyage of the Dawntreader for the umpteenth time...
  • Lemony Snickett "The Austere Academy", "Moby Dick" by Herman Melville and a book about dragons in British myth and legend.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fydor Dostoevsky.
  • Manhunt - The 12-day chase for Lincoln's Killer by James L. Swanson. It is very interesting, but not an easy read. I usually go for lighter stuff.
  • patricia Cornwalls All that Remains- the 3rd in a series of 10 with Dr. Kay Scarpetta, Medical Examiner. I am too far from the others I am reading to give a full listing...
  • "In My Father's House", by Bodi and Brock Thoene. It is the next book in the ongoing series by the authors. It is a Christian romance series. Got this particular book on Christmas day and have two chapters left to go. Then on to "A Thousand Shall Fall".
  • Bridget Jones, the Edge of Reason because a friend of mine got it for me for my birthday and I would feel bad if I didn't
  • "Sobre Dios" - "On God" By Krishnamurti
  • I'm in the middle of Life of Pi.
  • I'm currently between books, but once I start to feel semi-serious I'm planning to open up "Game of Shadows: Barry Bonds, BALCO, and the Steroids Scandal that Rocked Professional Sports" and have a read of that.
  • The Vibrational Universe by Kenneth Michael MacLean
  • "The Secret Teachings of All Ages" - Manly Hall
  • "Wuthering Heights" by Emily Bronte "The Carnivorous Carnival" by Lemony Snickett "The End" also by Lemony Snickett
  • A Jimi Hendrix biography.
  • The Penguin Encyclopedia.
  • Alan Alda's autobiography, Never have your Dog Stuffed - a great read.
  • Business Management in Practice - for my exam in a month - but I should be reading it more..
  • Grand Admiral”, the personal memoir of Erich Raeder, the man who oversaw the rebuilding of the German Navy after World War I. He was an hon0orable man who finally clashed with Hitler in 1943 and resigned. He was sentenced to imprisonment at Spandau for war crimes and then released. Also, I am currently reading “The Great Deluge”, by Tulane University historian Douglas Brinkley. The book covers a week of the Hurricane Katrina debacle that one reviewer described that it “has the drama and desperation of a Russian novel, the government intrigue of a Washington whodunit, and a keen sense of history and context due to the author's standing not only as a journalist and historian but as a New Orleans native."
  • I'm in the middle of The Memory Keeper's Daughter. It's okay, but kind of a slow read. I'm also in the middle of Son Of A Witch, which I've read before but I just re-read Wicked and just had to continue the story.
  • "Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong" by James W. Loewen. In a nutshell, it's about the myths and outright lies, and information conveniently left out of American history textbooks. It's fascinating, disturbing, and a wonderful read.
  • In Fury Born by David Weber and actually I am reading it for the second time. I enjoy most of what David Weber has written, I would currently consider him my favourite author. And I have just finished Treasure of Khan by Clive Cussler and Voice of the Gods by Trudi Canavan. The 1st book is a SF novel that is an expansion of an earlier novel Path of the Fury, about woman who is a marine in the distant future I suppose the equivalent would be a special ops person, and how she came to be one of the elite, and why she left, and when pirates kill her family what she does about it...she joins forces with an ancient awarness that was a greek fury from legend. I like it. David Weber writes a very good and believable heroine, not many man can do that.
  • Digital Fortress by Dan Brown. So far it isn't as good as any of his other books.
  • sister freaks is the only one im reading. Its about girls and women who gave their lives either as martyers or missionaries (full time). Its sooo inspiring!
  • Have just finished reading "Hannibal Rising" by Thomas Harris. Am now reading "The Da Vinci Code" by Dan Brown
  • I am making plans to go see the musical this summer, which is what prompted me to read it again. Son of a Witch isn't as good of a book, but my OCD kicked in and I have to read it because I know it's there... lol..
  • I'm reading a fun book called Map of Bones, I don't remember who the author is. It reminds me of Dan Brown's the DaVinci Code with all of history built into the suspense. It's basically about secrets that the Three Magi's bones contain. The Church and an American military team work together in order to get the bones back and unlock their secrets. I recommend it if you liked the DaVinci Code.
  • I'm reading two books now. One is The Hunchback Of Notre-Dame. It's good so far, I'd recomend it. I like Quasimoto. o-o And I'm also reading The Prince by Machiavelli, and it does offer some... intersting ideas, I must say. Update: I just finshed Beowulf, which was alright and a book called the 'Looking Glass Wars' the 'true' story of Alyss in wonderland. Next, I intend to read a /beautiful/ copy I had the luck to find of Paradise Lost.
  • 13 Little Blue Envelopes A Book of One's People & Their Diaries Inkspell & i just finished Chain of Fire. 13 Little Blue Envelopes= Interesting with some comedy and romance thrown in (read: basically another trashy teen romance novels-though not the best one- with a twist to it). Ginny, whos aunt is dead (?) wrote her 13 letters and gave her tickets in each one with a direction of where to go in Europe and it just is really hard to explain. I give it about a 7 out of 10 just because it doesn't grab your interest that wonderfully. A Book of One's People & Their Diaries- This is a sometimes difficult read, but once you pick it up, it's sometimes hard to put down once you're in to it. It's sort of philisopihical and educational at the same time. It also inspires one to start a diary ;) 8 out of 10 Inkspell- Extremley good read. 9 out of 10. It's magical, and fantasy, along with a little bit of love, and of course sacrifice. It litterally brought tears to my eyes. Chain of Fire- 6 out of 10. VERY VERY VERY hard to start reading. Not my favorite book ever, but it was somewhat inspiring and heart warming. Those are the books I'm reading/just finished with. Hope it helps...
  • 'Bleak House' by Dickens. It's really nice for just before I drift off. Basically, it's a mystery & a critically negative observation of period jurisprudence. I like the (sometimes confusing), duel narrative.
  • I'm reading The Tempest by William Shakespear and all of his other books because it's a challenge for me to stay entertained with something I don't fully understand and The Bible because I love reading about God and the things he's done and promises to do.
  • "The Awful Thing in the Attic" by famed paranormal writer Brad Steiger. It is a collection of some of the most terrifying, "true" ghost stories that the author himself has had expierence with, and investigated into. So far, it is very scary, and I can not read it when I am alone, or at night. I read alot of paranormal books, but this is by far one of the scariest.
  • Just got a book from my daughter and she thought and knew I have not read it, "We the Living" by Ayn Rand. The cover page is very very interesting.
  • The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir by George Lucius Salton I have about 100 pages left. This book is very good. The descriptions are very vivid and I almost feel as though I am there. The book is very well written and does not gloss over the tragic parts of the story. I highly recommend it. It is very sad but I feel a good book for all to read. Book Description (from Amazon.com) In September, 1939, George Lucius Salton's boyhood in Tyczyn, Poland, was shattered by escalating violence and terror under German occupation. His father, a lawyer, was forbidden to work, but eleven-year-old George dug potatoes, split wood, and resourcefully helped his family. They suffered hunger and deprivation, a forced march to the Rzeszow ghetto, then eternal separation when fourteen-year-old George and his brother were left behind to labor in work camps while their parents were deported in boxcars to die in Belzec. For the next three years, George slaved and barely survived in ten concentration camps, including Rzeszow, Plaszow, Flossenburg, Colmar, Sachsenhausen, Braunschweig, Ravensbrück, and Wobbelin. Cattle cars filled with skeletal men emptied into a train yard in Colmar, France. George and the other prisoners marched under the whips and fists of SS guards. But here, unlike the taunts and rocks from villagers in Poland and Germany, there was applause. "I could clearly hear the people calling: 'Shame! Shame!' . . . Suddenly, I realized that the people of Colmar were applauding us! They were condemning the inhumanity of the Germans!" Of the 500 prisoners of the Nazis who marched through the streets of Colmar in the spring of 1944, just fifty were alive one year later when the U.S. Army 82nd Airborne Division liberated the Wobbelin concentration camp on the afternoon of May 2, 1945. "I felt something stir deep within my soul. It was my true self, the one who had stayed deep within and had not forgotten how to love and how to cry, the one who had chosen life and was still standing when the last roll call ended."
  • Just finished reading My Life by Bill Clinton. I just started reading A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking. Gotta tell you...this book is purely for science enthusiasts and it takes a clear and calm mind to grasp the content...it's all about physics. I think I will have to read it atleast one more time to make any sense out of it.
  • War and Peace. i lost a bet and had to read it. I don't get it.
  • at the moment im reading street kid its unbelievable what some kids have to go through and survive it all as well it really makes you take a check on things and realise how lucky you are
  • Currently reading 'The Eustace Diamonds' by Anthony Trollope (I can't imagine why the family never changed their name...) while commuting and some romance novel when I soak in the tub - I call them 'bathtub books' and it doesn't matter when you start or stop reading them , they're just formula books and you can just start one again in a year or two and know the plot in a second or two.
  • Last night I was bored and decided to look through my book collection to see if I had missedout anything. I found that I hadn't read The Satanic Bible by Anton Szandor Lavey. I am reading it to understand why it's such a big talking point and why soomany people are converting to this way of behaving and thinking. So far from what I have read it isn't just about worshippingthe devil,it is about something deeper and more complex than that.
  • The return of Sherlock Holmes, and "Selected Tales", from Conan Doyle the first and Poe the second. I really found Sherlock Holmes' stories interesting but a bit too classic. Poe is a master in atmosphere creation.
  • One of the books I am currently reading- I am one of those that has several books going at once - is Patricia Cornwells "Cruel and Unusual" . A "killer" has been put to death but his fingerprints are found at a new crime scene. So far so good- i poured through the first four books in her "KAY SCARPELLA, medical examiner" series...
  • I am reading a book called "The Butterfly House". I don't know the author's name (I left the book at home. I'm at the library right now). But it is a really good book about two girls growing up in single parent families and the things that happen to them. It is sad and bittersweet but a good read all the same.
  • Tangerine. It was ok
  • "Ranger's Appentice: The Burning Bridge" by John Flanagan-256 pgs. (the 2nd in a series) Description (not written by me): Much like its predecessor's jumpstart prologue, this sequel leaps into action as if there is no time to waste, picking right up where Ruins of Gorlan (Philomel, 2002/VOYA December 2005) left off. Halt and Will are tracking Wargals, war is pending, and Morgarath is gathering followers. Fans will recall that Wargals are bad, Morgarath is worse, and Halt and Will are sort of reconnaissance/messenger/foresters in a medieval-styled fantasy world on the brink of civil war. Will, having earned a silver oak leaf, is now entrusted with traveling as emissary to Celtica and gets mixed up in the middle of solving the mystery of why miners have gone missing. Is it part of Morgarath's evil plan? New characters are introduced, each as delightfully complex as the last. Will, Horace, and Alyss mature, and Evanlyn, a rescued refugee is an interesting addition. Halt remains gruff and unintentionally humorous. Honing new skills such as knife combat and near misses with arrows make for exciting scenes. Details are carefully placed, and clues to the denouement are mentioned early. Politics and geography play noticeably larger roles in this book, resulting in a deeper and richer story: Military success hinges on the control of a specific narrow mountain pass. The book's title and fiery cover give away the climatic ending, and occasionally the plot's direction is too obvious, but a surprise twist will keep readers on pins and needles waiting for the next book. "New Moon" by Stephenie Meyer-576 pgs.(for the millionth time [also the 2nd in a series]) Description (not written by me either): All is not well between demon-magnet Bella and Edward Cullen, her vampire Romeo. An innocent papercut at Edward's house puts Bella in grave danger when various members of the Cullen family can barely resist their hunger at the smell of blood. The Cullens promptly leave town, afraid of endangering Edward's beloved, and Bella sinks into an overwhelming depression. Months later, she finally emerges from her funk to rebuild her life, focusing on her friendship with besotted teen Jacob from the reservation. Bella's unhealthy enthrallment to Edward leads her into dangerous and self-destructive behavior despite her new friends, and supernatural complications are bound to reappear. Bella's being hunted by an evil vampire, and Jacob's adolescent male rage turns out to be incipient lycanthropy: It seems many Quileute Indians become werewolves in the presence of vampires, their natural enemies. Psychic miscommunications and angst-ridden dramatic gestures lead to an exciting page-turner of a conclusion drenched in the best of Gothic romantic excess. Despite Bella's flat and obsessive personality, this tale of tortured demon lovers entices.
  • I'm currently reading The Giver, and A Great and Terrible Beauty. I reccomend both books<3
  • Material Culture In London In an Age of Transition (archaelogy monograph). It's a catalog of items recovered during excavations of the banks near Southwark. Quite good if one is interested in this sort of thing. It is very detailed and orgaized well.
  • Fear And Loathing In America by Hunter Thompson and Salam's Lot- Stephen King.
  • Sebastian Junger's book about the Boston Strangler, "A Death in Belmont." Well written, personal, and fascinated. A look at justice in America in the 1960s. Haven't finished yet, but can't wait to finish it.
  • GURPS Biotech and GURPS Powers. They are rulebooks for an RPG; I'm waiting to find something like Cryptonomicon or The Illuminatus Trilogy before I get back into 'real' books. Very well researched and thought out. You'd be surprised at the factual stuff you'll find in games, at least GURPS. Also GURPS reminds me that there are some smart Texans; SJ Games is out of Austin.
  • I just finished Brother Odd by Dean Koontz. It is the third book about Odd Thomas, a fry cook who sees dead people, and his adventures helping them. I just started reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. Apparently it is about the life of a hermaphrodite. It is hard to get into, right now he is doing the history of his family, and circumstances that lead to the gene mutation that caused his condition. It has great reviews at Amazon, and the friend who loaned it to me said it was great, so I will finish it.
  • I'm reading a book called Halo: Ghosts of Onyx. Its is a great book so far. But it is the fourth in its series. The series starts with Halo: The Fall of Reach #2- Halo: The Flood #3- Halo: First Strike If you are a Halo fan then you have to read these. They explain everything about Halo, before and after. There are so many thing you wouldn't know about Halo and when you read these you'll be amazed. My book is basically about the other Spartans II's that survived The Fall of Reach besides the Master Chief and the Spartan III's. To understand this you need to read the first 3 books.
  • for school we just finished reading tuesdays with morrie. its about a teacher who's dying and gives life lessons to a favorite student who hasn't seen him in years that changes his life. my opinion is kind of blank because i've seen the movie 3 years ago so i wasn't really into the book but the meaning is good.
  • Mergers, i love it so much because it is exciting, yet it also has a huge messege about society and racism
  • Eragon, and the movie didn't do it justice.
  • &quot;Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind" by: Shunryu Suzuki-enlightening "Book of Five Rings" by: Miyamoto Musashi-inspiring "Choke" by: Chuck Palahniuk-entertaining
  • DESPIRATION By; Stephen King This story is a fast paced in your face, heart pounding, horror and carnage that takes place on an interstate 50 near Despiration Nevada. The story builds to some exiting, surreal and tragic points throughout the book so far. This book gory, compelling and seriouisly moving, I love it.
  • David Suzuki's 'Naked Ape to Super Species'. It is the most amazing, inspiring book I have read in a long, long time. I would love to see it mandatory reading for every school child. What is it about - the blurb about the book says it all ...."The book examines how human arrogance - demonstrated by a disregard for the small and microscopic species that constitute the Earth's engine, and the reckless use of technological inventions like powerful herbicides or genetically engineered crops - is threatening the health of the populace and the safety of the food supply. But this is not simply a doom-and-gloom scenario or alarmist creed. The authors introduce readers to the people who are fighting back, those who are resisting the inexorable advance of the "global economy" juggernaut. From Naked Ape to Superspecies offers strategies for making the right turn at this crossroads and prospering by reshaping the place of humanity in nature.
  • A book titled "The Master And Margerita" by Mikhail Bulgakov. It is a commentary on Soviet Russia, written by a Russian during the Soviet era, so it is shrouded in metaphor and allegory. The basic storyline is of the devil coming to Moscow, creating havoc and, where I am just now, turning one lady into a witch. There is also a background story dealing with Pontious Pilate's life. I find it a very interesting read, and am enthralled by how Bulgakov covers his true thughts on his country's government.
  • State of Denial by Bob Woodward, and it's an interesting outlook on the curently dismal Iraq War.
  • right now im reading "The Memory Keepers Daughter" by Kim Edwards. its about a family that gives birth to twins, one happens to be down syndrome. the father, not knowing what to do, has his nurse (btw the father is also the dr who delivered the twins) send the downsyndrome girl to an institution and tells his wife that the child died at birth. the nurse ends up running away and raising the girl as her own. because of that one choice he made has changed all their lives forever and its about the familys struggle to deal with what happened. i think its a pretty good book.
  • Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Gun (part of the Bluford Series), A Death in Venice,
  • I'm reading Move Over, Girl which isn't very deep or philosphical at all- unless one man's opinion about all of the girls on his college campus counts- but it's pretty good so far. I wish I could find a deeper book, something I could vibe off of, but eh...In due time, I guess.
  • I'm reading The Five People You Meet in Heaven and rereading Tuesdays With Morrie for the 4th time, both books should be read by everyone
  • I read a TON. I actually just went to Barnes & Noble today and got 4 new books, but right now I'm reading 'The Key' by Marianne Curley, it's the third book in the Gaurdians of Time Trilogy. It's a fantasy book (fantasy is basically all I read) and the series so far is kinda boring, but I'm hoping this book will end the series with a bang. My friend actually recommended the book because it's her favorite series ever, but I don't think it's as great as like, some of my other books. =/ Maybe other people will see what she sees in this book, but ... it's just 'good' for me, but nothing special.
  • i read alot... my current read is Eragon by Christopher Paolini. I also enjoy any book by V.C Andrews... :)
  • I am reading George Bernawd Shaw Man and Superman,it is a well written play but the vocabulary used is challanging to read
  • The gormenghast trilogy (by mervyn peake), haven't got far yet, but so far it is the most amazing thing i have ever read, even better than the back of the cereal boxes with all the pretty pictures
  • I just finished Stephen King's "Lisey's Story." There are mixed reviews out there on this one, but I really enjoyed it.
  • I'm reading Shopaholic and Baby by Sophia Kinsella.. One of my British guilty pleasures... It's about a hilarious shopaholic who is about to have a baby. I think its 5th in the series!! It's pretty funny.
  • Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium Cormac McCarthy, The Road Norman Mailer, The Castle in the Forest. The Road is another McCarthy dystopic novel. Riviting, fearsome. Travels is typical Auster, not one of his best. The Castle is an investigation into the Devil's role in the life of A. Hitler. All three are page turners.
  • Currently I'm reading a book called Greenvoe by George Mackay Brown. It's set on the Orkney Islands (off the north coast of Scotland). It's about the inhabitants of one of the islands and the coming of mysterious military men and their "secret operation". So far, it's really rather good.
  • Who Moved My Cheese by Spencer Johnson. (Yoda like lessons about life and keeping perspective.)
  • Bodega Dreams-Ernesto Quinonez < AMAZING! The Bronx- Evelyn Gonzalez 102 Minutes- Jim Dyer& Kevin Flynn GOTTI:Rise and Fall-Jerry Capeci&Gene Mustain
  • well currently i'm not reading a book, i havn't found the time but i can tell u about my alltime fave novel lol it's called "twilight" by stephanie meyer, it also has a sequal "new moon" and soon will have atleast 3 more sequals lol it's about a thrilling romance between a mortal and a vampire, i sugest you all read it! it's the best book in the world!!!!!!! woot! woot! (and u'll love edward cullen)
  • Clan of the Cave Bears, so far a great book that appeals to things I'm interested in.
  • James Patterson..Step on a Crack
  • _Programming the Universe: A Quantum Computer Scientist Takes on the Cosmos_ by Seth Lloyd. I've been interested in cosmology and quantum mechanics for a long time from a very very very amateurish POV (I don't get math, for one). This book is written very clearly so far, with a sense of humor, and it's giving a really clear and well-written explanation of a new theory about the formation and development of the universe and everything in it. Esp. if you've read books like Stephen Hawking's _A Brief History of Time_ and/or Brian Greene's _The Elegant Universe_, this is the next big thing. :-) To a certain degree I think cosmologists can't possibly have a clue what REALLY happened at the Big Bang or why the universe turned out as it did. They just keep coming up with different ways to describe it/make sense of it/think about it. It's such a huge subject that I think scientists need a concrete image in their heads so they can begin to think about it in a coherent manner.
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray. Oscar Wilde's always great.
  • The Awakening Heart... So far hasn't awakened my heart, but haven't read too much yet.
  • &quot;We Need to Talk About Kevin" by Lionel Schriver - my second time through but I'm enjoying it just as much, in my opinion it's a pretty fantastic book. "Never Let Me Go" by Kazuo Ishiguro - I've only just started it today in so I can't really give an opinion yet. "A Wizard of Earthsea" by Ursula K Le Guin - enjoying it very much and I can't believe I didn't read it years ago.
  • Beach Road by James Patterson. It is a must read. It's about a murder.
  • I'm reading Gone with the wind and it's a great story about a southern belle who has hardships following the civil war and can't make up her mind between two men one a cowardly gentleman named Ashley Wilkes[who's married with a son] and a rambuctous jerk named Rhett Butler who loves the company of women.My opinion is it;s a good book but did it have to be so long.
  • Island of the Saints The Faith of Mr. Rogers The Life and Death of Dietrich Bonhoeffer to name three of them. They are all good.
  • Stuart: A Life Backwards. It is the most amazing book I have read in a very long time and I am an avid reader! I would most certainly recommend it however, although it isn't an easy read it is a book that I believe everyone should try to experience
  • Silence of the lambs by Thomas Harris!!! Excellent till now!!
  • Glory days by Julian Hardyman, it is all about living a Godly life in modern society. Very good so far, helpful and challenging!
  • Remainder by Tom McCarthy

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